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New Surgical Strategy Offers Hope for Repairing Spinal Injuries

Surgery to reconnect sensory neurons to the spinal cord after a traumatic spinal injury works because offshoots from the spinal cord complete the spinal circuit.

Scientists in the UK and Sweden previously developed a new surgical technique to reconnect sensory neurons to the spinal cord after traumatic spinal injuries. Now, they have gained new insight into how the technique works at a cellular level by recreating it in rats with implications for designing new therapies for injuries where the spinal cord itself is severed.
August 19, 2017/by nmortho
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Exercise in Early Life Has Long-Lasting Benefits

The researchers, from the Liggins Institute at the University of Auckland, found that bone retains a "memory" of exercise's effects long after the exercise is ceased, and this bone memory continues to change the way the body metabolises a high-fat diet, and published these results in Frontiers in Physiology.

The research team compared the bone health and metabolism of rats across different diet and exercise conditions, zeroing in on messenger molecules that signal the activity of genes in bone marrow. Rats were either given a high-fat diet and a wheel for extra exercise in their cage, a high-fat diet but no wheel, or a regular diet and no wheel. In the rats given a high-fat diet and an exercise wheel, the early extra physical activity caused inflammation-linked genes to be turned down.
August 11, 2017/by nmortho
new mexico, orthopaedic doctors, albuquerque

13 Causes of Leg Cramps–and How To Stop Them

If you haven't already, you will probably experience leg cramps at some point in your life. They can hit at the worst possible moments; whether you're lying in bed at night or taking a run on the treadmill, that sharp stabbing pain can feel totally debilitating. If leg cramps, also called charley horses, persist, they can become even more irritating, perhaps knocking you off your typical exercise or sleep routine.

A leg cramp is a sharp, sudden contraction or tightening of the muscle in the calf, which usually lasts a few seconds to a few minutes. If a cramp does hit, you can ease it in the moment by stretching the muscle gently. To find a long-term solution to leg cramps, however, you might need to take a closer look at their many potential causes.

Here, experts weigh in on the major reasons you might be experiencing leg cramps, so you can keep those muscles free of charley horses for good.
August 9, 2017/by nmortho
Hip Exercises

Hip, Hip, Hooray! Keep Your Hips Healthy

Article BY ANDREW HEFFERNAN | Featured on Experience Life

Strong,…
August 7, 2017/by nmortho
People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Are at Increased Risk of Joint Damage in the Neck

People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Are at Increased Risk of Joint Damage in the Neck

Yet the condition called cervical myelopathy can progress with…
August 4, 2017/by nmortho
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Late Teen Years are Key Period for Bone Growth

The late adolescent years are an important period for gaining bone mineral, even after a teenager attains his or her adult height. Scientists analyzing a racially diverse, multicenter sample from a large, federally funded national study say their findings reinforce the importance of diet and physical activities during the late teen years, as a foundation for lifelong health.

"We often think of a child's growth largely with respect to height, but overall bone development is also important," said lead author Shana E. McCormack, MD, a pediatric researcher at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). "This study shows that roughly 10 percent of bone mass continues to accumulate after a teenager reaches his or her adult height."
July 26, 2017/by nmortho
orthopedic doctors, in albuquerque, new mexico

ACL Surgery Often Successful Over Long Term

People who undergo knee surgery for a torn anterior cruciate ligament(ACL) can expect to stay active and maintain a high quality of life, researchers report.

Activity levels may decline over time, but a new study found that those who had the knee operation could usually still play sports 10 years later.

"An active patient may view an ACL injury as devastating, but our research adds to short- and long-term studies that show a good prognosis for return to pre-injury quality of life," said the study's corresponding author, Dr. Kurt Spindler.
July 25, 2017/by nmortho
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One Minute of Running Per Day Associated With Better Bone Health in Women

A single minute of exercise each day is linked to better bone health in women, new research shows.

Scientists from the University of Exeter and the University of Leicester found those who did "brief bursts" of high-intensity, weight-bearing activity equivalent to a medium-paced run for pre-menopausal women, or a slow jog for post-menopausal women, had better bone health.

Using data from UK Biobank, the researchers found that women who on average did 60-120 seconds of high-intensity, weight-bearing activity per day had 4% better bone health than those who did less than a minute.
July 21, 2017/by nmortho
new mexico, orthopaedics, albuquerque

Many Parents in the Dark About Concussions, Research Shows

Despite the large volume of information about sports related concussions on the Internet, many parents and guardians of young athletes have a limited understanding of concussions, according to a study co-authored by a faculty member of UTA's College of Nursing and Health Innovation.

In the study, which was published in May in the Journal of Applied Behavioral Research, Cynthia Trowbridge, an associate professor of kinesiology and athletic trainer, and co-author Sheetal J. Patel of Stanford University, found that a significant number of caregivers have a limited understanding of concussions and their impact on a child's future.
July 16, 2017/by nmortho
orthopaedic doctors, albuquerque

5 Ways to Cope With the Changes Your Feet Undergo With Age

As our bodies shrink with age, our feet often seem to get bigger. Feet do not literally grow, orthopedists agree. Rather, over the years, tissue in our feet degenerates and ligaments become looser, which causes strain on joints and can lead to arthritis.
Conditions like diabetes can create other foot problems, says Dr. Andrew Shapiro, an orthopedist in Long Island, New York. For example, patients with diabetes could develop diabetic neuropathy, in which they lose sensation on the soles of their feet. That increases the chances of infection, because people with that condition could break the skin on the soles of their feet and not realize it.

People can take a number of steps to lessen their foot pain or mitigate the effects of diabetes, arthritis and deteriorating ligaments, Leahy and Shapiro say. Here are five:
July 13, 2017/by nmortho
new mexico, orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

Childhood Obesity a Major Link to Hip Diseases

New research from the University, published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood journal, shows a strong link between childhood obesity and hip diseases in childhood.

Significant hip deformities affect around 1 in 500 children. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain, and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood.
July 10, 2017/by nmortho
orthopaedic, doctors, albuquerque

Understanding Cartilage, Joints, and the Aging Process

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis. Arthritis causes inflammation and pain in one or more joints in the body. OA is also known as degenerative joint disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 27 million American adults over the age of 25 have osteoarthritis. That makes OA one of the leading causes of disability in adult Americans.
July 7, 2017/by nmortho