orthopedic care, albuquerque, nm

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gum Disease

Article Found by Carol Eustice | Found on VeryWell

Starting with childhood, you have been taught to take care of your teeth. Everyone knows about the importance of having regular dental check-ups. Read more

New Mexico Orthopaedics Opens New Physical Therapy Location

NMOA Surgeon Leads Team Providing Joint Replacements for Adults Living with Arthritis

Joshua Carothers, MD

Dr. Joshua Carothers, a surgeon with New Mexico Orthopaedic Associates (NMOA), recently returned from a mission trip to Honduras with a team of Albuquerque healthcare providers. The team arrived in Honduras on September 28 and in three days they performed fifteen (15) joint replacement surgeries for sixteen (16) adults living with debilitating arthritis.

Working with Dr. Carothers was NMOA physician assistant Tyler Jefferson, Lovelace Hospital nurse Amber Dobbins, and a representative of the orthopaedic device company Depuy, who donated the joint replacement hardware. The local caregivers donated their time and surgical expertise.

The Albuquerque team joined up with other medical professionals who were also volunteering their time and skills as part of a mission trip with Operation Walk based in Denver, Colorado.  About fifty-five surgeons, physicians’ assistants, nurses, physical therapists, anesthesiologists, representatives from orthopaedic implant companies and medical doctors participated in the 2017 mission trip from September 29 – October 1. Altogether, the mission team provided 60 new joints to people that would otherwise never have the means to have their severe arthritis treated.

Altogether, the mission team provided 60 new joints to people that would otherwise never have the means to have their severe arthritis treated.

“We bring everything from the IV that the patients get when they enter the hospital to the bandage and home aids that they go home with including all the implants and instruments” said NMOA surgeon Joshua Carothers, M. D. “In addition to providing surgeries”, said Dr Carothers, “we spend time training the local doctors, nurses, and therapists.”

Operation Walk is a not-for-profit volunteer medical services organization that provides free surgical treatments for patients in developing countries and in the United States who suffer from debilitating bone and joint conditions, such as arthritis, and do not have access to medical care. Founded in 1994, Operation Walk teams have operated on hundreds of patients in Russia, Cuba, Nepal, China, the Philippines, Peru, Nicaragua, Mexico and the United States. Over 6,000 patients have received new knees and hips through the International Operation Walk organization since 1994.

Dr. Carothers, P.A. Tyler Jefferson, and nurse gave this patient a new knee on September 30, 2017.
Her daughter was glad to see new hope for her mother after watching her live for years with debilitating arthritis

“The intense, never-ending pain endured by the patients we treat makes conducting normal, productive lives difficult to impossible. Because of their inability to walk and provide for themselves, many lose their jobs, their families, and the ability to experience the basic joys of life. It’s a great feeling to be there and give a new beginning to people who do not have access to this kind of healthcare where they live.”

The week-long mission trips are designed to restore the gift of walking to as many people as possible, typically more than fifty patients while educating local healthcare workers in advanced surgical and rehabilitation procedures. “I have been working and traveling with the group to Panama and Honduras over the last 6 years,” said Dr. Carothers “and have been really proud to bring a team from Albuquerque that represents our city so well”.

About Dr. Carothers

NMOA surgeon Joshua Carothers focuses on total knee and hip replacements at the New Mexico Center for Joint Replacement Surgery, one of the Centers of Excellence at New Mexico Orthopaedic Associates. His Medical Degree is from the University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine in 2002, where he graduated first in his class. He completed a five-year residency in orthopaedic surgery at Duke University Medical Center in 2007 and an adult reconstruction fellowship with Colorado Joint Replacement in Denver in 2008.

New Mexico Orthopaedic Associates                                                  

The independent physician group concentrates on the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and degenerative conditions. NMOA includes more than 30 physicians who provide both surgical and non-surgical treatment options for patients. The group’s comprehensive care model integrates the diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of orthopaedic, sports medicine and spine care within one practice. NMOA offers patients a choice of two clinic locations in Albuquerque and Rio Rancho. NMOA provides surgery in a physician-owned surgery center, physical and occupational therapy, X-ray and MRI, Quick Care Clinics and workplace injury care. NMOA has been serving patients for over thirty years.

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More & More Young People Are Getting Arthritis: Here’s What You Can Do

Article 

Think arthritis only affects the elderly? Think again. By 2030, an estimated 580 million people worldwide, ages 18 and older, will have been diagnosed with the disease. Pretty eye-opening, right?

Conventional medicine tends to treat arthritis with strong, immune-suppressing medications that temporarily relieve the symptoms of the disease. Unfortunately, I’ve seen how these medications can also damage your gut and how they fail to truly address the root cause of the issue. This World Arthritis Day, it’s time to make a change. I’m here to tell you that there’s another way—a way that’s designed to address the underlying causes—in order to reduce inflammation without medication. Here’s how:

1. You can treat all kinds of arthritis with one approach.

There are more than a dozen different kinds of arthritis, and while there are certainly differences in conventional understanding and treatment for each one, they all have common root causes and triggers for inflammation and pain. For example, the two most common diagnoses are rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). While RA is considered an inflammatory (autoimmune) disease and OA is typically thought of as the result of “wear and tear” and injury to the joint, both of these conditions are influenced by lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise. No matter what kind of arthritis you have, it’s important to know that it can be made worse by inflammation that starts elsewhere in the body, including the gut. Which brings me to my next point…

2. Heal the gut, and you heal the joints.

You may have heard some talk about gut health—and the gut-brain connection or the gut-pain connection—and you’ve probably heard the word “microbiome,” or the friendly bacteria in your body. Fascinating studies have confirmed that the root cause of your arthritis is most likely lurking in your digestive system, so to heal your joints, you must first heal your gut. But where do you start? The best first step is to take a probiotic daily to help remove the harmful microbes that might be causing your symptoms, but some require a more intensive plan.

3. Treat your terrain with inflammation-fighting foods.

A fresh start for your microbiome means a new chance to influence your “terrain,” or what I think of as the body’s deepest soil, where cells either thrive or wither. There’s a strong connection between your diet, your gut microbiome, and your pain level, so I recommend choosing foods that fight inflammation like organic plants and foods high in fiber and healthy fats, while avoiding refined sugars, dairy products, and red meats. Here are some of my guiding principles:

  • Increase fiber, micronutrients, and phytonutrients, or, in less-scary terms, eat more vegetables and fruits, and choose organic whenever possible.
  • Reduce refined sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and refined grains.
  • Improve the quality of fat by removing refined oils and hydrogenated fats.
  • Improve the quality of the animal protein you eat by choosing 100 percent grass-fed and finished beef, free-range chicken, and sustainably farmed, low-mercury fish.
  • Limit salt, food dyes, and preservatives (which happens naturally when you limit processed foods).

4. Carve out time for daily stress-reduction activities.

Traumatic events and ongoing stress are very real triggers for inflammatory diseases. In our go-go-go world, we’re always rushing; we can’t miss this deadline or that meeting, and we very rarely take the time to sit back, relax, and let our minds reset. Diet and stress are two root causes of a damaged gut, inflammation, and chronic disease, so it’s no surprise that in order to heal your arthritis naturally, you must take time to practice your favorite stress reduction activities daily. I recommend meditation, yoga, long walks through nature, and journaling to ease the mind.

My upcoming book, Healing Arthritis, talks all this and more, and offers a step-by-step, two-week plan to get to the bottom of the disease, reduce inflammation, and heal your joint pain—once and for all.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more. If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

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Foot pain? New study says look at hip and knee for complete diagnosis

Article Found on ScienceDaily

A study by researchers at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) and Harvard Medical School suggests new guidelines may be in order for evaluating and treating lower extremity pain. Investigators set out to determine if there was a relation between foot pain and lower extremity joint pain, and they found a significant association between foot pain and knee or hip pain. Read more

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What Is a Frozen Shoulder?

Article Found on WebMD

Frozen shoulder is a condition that affects your shoulder joint. It usually involves pain and stiffness that develops gradually, gets worse and then finally goes away. This can take anywhere from a year to 3 years.

Your shoulder is made up of three bones that form a ball-and-socket joint. They are your upper arm (humerus), shoulder blade (scapula), and collarbone (clavicle). There’s also tissue surrounding your shoulder joint that holds everything together. This is called the shoulder capsule. Read more

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Osteoporosis: Biology behind age-related bone loss revealed

Researchers have mapped a cell mechanism that plays a key role in age-related bone loss. They suggest that the results not only shed light on the biology of osteoporosis but should also help to develop new drugs to treat the disease.

In the journal PNAS, scientists from both the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Zhejiang University in China explain how a protein called Cbf-beta is important for controlling the rate at which new bone cells replace old ones.

Osteoporosis is a disease in which bones become weak and brittle, increasing the risk of fractures. Bone is a living tissue that is constantly regenerating, and the body maintains a balance – called homeostasis – between the creation of new bone cells and the removal of old cells.

As we age, the rate at which new bone replaces old or damaged bone slows down and bone density gradually diminishes. But if this rate slows too much, it can lead to osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is a big global health problem and is more common in women than in men. Estimates suggest that around 1 in 3 women and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 experience bone fractures due to osteoporosis.

In women over the age of 45, the disease accounts for more days spent in hospital than diabetesheart attack, and breast cancer.

In the United States, low bone mass and osteoporosis are thought to affect over half (55 percent) of people aged 50 and older.

Progenitor cells

Progenitor cells are immature cells that stand in reserve until they receive genetic instructions from transcription factors that tell them which type of cell to become. In the case of bone tissue, the progenitor cells are bone marrow “mesenchymal stem cells.”

Depending on the instructions they receive, the mesenchymal stem cells can mature into: bone-producing cells called osteoblasts; cartilage-producing cells, or chondrocytes; and adipocytes, or fat cells.

Until now, it was not clear what was controlling the direction of maturity of the progenitor cells so as to maintain the delicate equilibrium or homeostasis of bone formation.

When they investigated the transcription factors controlling the direction of maturity, the team found that a protein called core-binding factor subunit beta (Cbf-beta) was vital for switching destinations between bone-producing cell and fat cell.

Cbf-beta plays key role

The team found that all three groups of mice developed severe osteoporosis and accumulated fats cells in their bone marrow. The pattern was similar to that seen in age-related bone loss.

They also found increased expression of fat cell genes in the progenitor cells – that is, the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells – and bone cells of the skulls of mice lacking Cbf-beta.

Further investigation showed that when Cbf-beta activates a signal inside a type of cell known as Wnt10b/beta-catenin, it blocks expression of the gene that directs the progenitor cells to mature into fat cells. In other words, it inhibits the “adipogenesis regulatory gene.”

The team also found that Cbf-beta drives progenitor cells to become bone-producing cells through another type of Wnt signal sent to nearby cells: the “Wnt paracrine pathway.”

The researchers hope that their mapping will improve understanding of the role that Cbf-beta plays in maintaining bone, especially as we age.

The insights resulting from this study will fill an important knowledge gap and may facilitate the development of novel bone loss therapeutics that minimize the adverse side effects on bone homeostasis.”


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

best, new mexico, orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

Healing Broken Bones as Quickly as Possible

Article by Jonathan Cluett, MD | Found on VeryWell

Fractures, broken bones—you can call it what you wish, they mean the same thing—are among the most common orthopedic problems; about seven million broken bones come to medical attention each year in the United States. The average person in a developed country can expect to sustain two fractures over the course of their lifetime.

Despite what you may have heard, a broken bone is not worse than a fracture, they both mean the same thing. Read more

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Can You Increase Your Height As An Adult?

Article by Jenna Fletcher | Found on MedicalNewsToday

Some people are unhappy with their height and wish they could be taller. Unfortunately for most adults, there is not much that can be done to increase height.

After age 18, most tricks to increase height will not work, even with good nutrition and exercise

However, there are ways to appear taller and prevent loss of height, which is common as people age. Read more

new mexico, orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

How Do Broken Bones Heal?

Article by 

A fall, followed by a crack – many people are no stranger to this. Broken bones are painful, but the majority heal very well. The secret lies in stem cells and bone’s natural ability to renew itself.

Many people think of bones as being solid, rigid, and structural. Bone is, of course, key to keeping our bodies upright, but it is also a highly dynamic and active organ. Read more

New Mexico Orthopaedics Opens New Physical Therapy Location

New Mexico Orthopaedics Opens After Hours Clinic

New Mexico Orthopaedics Associates (NMOA) has opened an After Hours Clinic at their Albuquerque Downtown location. Service is provided by an “Ortho Injury Care Team” Monday through Thursday from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm.

Rafael GarciaThe Ortho Injury Care Team treats patients with unexpected injuries such as strains, sprains, minor dislocations, fractures, and sports injuries. The team includes a certified physician’s assistant, casting and X-ray professionals, and an orthopaedic surgeon. The new After Hours Clinic will allow adults and children with unexpected orthopaedic injuries to be seen by a trained team of orthopaedic medical professionals, without going to an Emergency Room or an Urgent Care center.

According to NMOA President Dr. Jeffery Racca, M.D., “The new After Hours Clinic will be a great resource for our community. We’re going beyond services provided at a traditional urgent care center by offering care from an orthopaedic surgeon who is on-site while the After Hours Clinic is open.”

Racca went onto explain that “The NMOA surgeon on duty during the After Hours Clinic will also be seeing patients for regular clinic appointments. The extended clinic hours will create more convenient times for new and established patients to be seen for consultations, evaluations and follow up appointments outside of the traditional 8 am to 5 pm clinic schedule.”

Micah Benson at New Mexico Orthopaedics“Altogether, said Racca, “this new clinic supports our goal of bringing orthopaedic professionals to our community at patient- convenient times and locations, as we continue to advance orthopaedic excellence for New Mexicans.”

After Hours Clinic patients that need follow up such as surgery or physical therapy also have the option for treatment at the NMOA surgery center or one of four NMOA physical therapy locations, so that their entire case can be coordinated within one practice.

Founded in 1987, New Mexico Orthopaedics is an independent physician group that concentrates solely on the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries and degenerative conditions. The most qualified and highly trained muscular skeletal specialists provide both surgical and non-surgical treatment options for patients. The group’s comprehensive care model integrates the diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of orthopaedics, sports medicine and spine care within in one practice. Patients have a choice of several care locations; in Albuquerque with a downtown clinic and surgery center, and three separate physical therapy locations as well as a new physician clinic with physical therapy at the NMOA Rio Rancho location.