good orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

If You Tear a Knee Ligament, Arthritis Is Likely to Follow in 10 Years

Article by Gina Kolata | Found on NY Times

When Jason Lalli tore his left anterior cruciate ligament at age 26, he thought he would be fine as soon as he had his knee repaired. As a soccer player who competed through college and then on recreational teams, he knew that A.C.L. injuries could be debilitating but also that orthopedists could fix them.

He figured that he would miss a season, but that he could play and coach the game he loved for the rest of his life.

Four years later, his knee began to ache, and the pain became more constant over time, nagging almost “like a toothache,” he said. Within about another year, Lalli’s doctor did more work on the knee and gave him bad news: He had arthritis. Read more

orthopedic care, albuquerque, nm

Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gum Disease

Article Found by Carol Eustice | Found on VeryWell

Starting with childhood, you have been taught to take care of your teeth. Everyone knows about the importance of having regular dental check-ups. Read more

orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

More & More Young People Are Getting Arthritis: Here’s What You Can Do

Article 

Think arthritis only affects the elderly? Think again. By 2030, an estimated 580 million people worldwide, ages 18 and older, will have been diagnosed with the disease. Pretty eye-opening, right?

Conventional medicine tends to treat arthritis with strong, immune-suppressing medications that temporarily relieve the symptoms of the disease. Unfortunately, I’ve seen how these medications can also damage your gut and how they fail to truly address the root cause of the issue. This World Arthritis Day, it’s time to make a change. I’m here to tell you that there’s another way—a way that’s designed to address the underlying causes—in order to reduce inflammation without medication. Here’s how:

1. You can treat all kinds of arthritis with one approach.

There are more than a dozen different kinds of arthritis, and while there are certainly differences in conventional understanding and treatment for each one, they all have common root causes and triggers for inflammation and pain. For example, the two most common diagnoses are rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). While RA is considered an inflammatory (autoimmune) disease and OA is typically thought of as the result of “wear and tear” and injury to the joint, both of these conditions are influenced by lifestyle choices such as diet and exercise. No matter what kind of arthritis you have, it’s important to know that it can be made worse by inflammation that starts elsewhere in the body, including the gut. Which brings me to my next point…

2. Heal the gut, and you heal the joints.

You may have heard some talk about gut health—and the gut-brain connection or the gut-pain connection—and you’ve probably heard the word “microbiome,” or the friendly bacteria in your body. Fascinating studies have confirmed that the root cause of your arthritis is most likely lurking in your digestive system, so to heal your joints, you must first heal your gut. But where do you start? The best first step is to take a probiotic daily to help remove the harmful microbes that might be causing your symptoms, but some require a more intensive plan.

3. Treat your terrain with inflammation-fighting foods.

A fresh start for your microbiome means a new chance to influence your “terrain,” or what I think of as the body’s deepest soil, where cells either thrive or wither. There’s a strong connection between your diet, your gut microbiome, and your pain level, so I recommend choosing foods that fight inflammation like organic plants and foods high in fiber and healthy fats, while avoiding refined sugars, dairy products, and red meats. Here are some of my guiding principles:

  • Increase fiber, micronutrients, and phytonutrients, or, in less-scary terms, eat more vegetables and fruits, and choose organic whenever possible.
  • Reduce refined sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and refined grains.
  • Improve the quality of fat by removing refined oils and hydrogenated fats.
  • Improve the quality of the animal protein you eat by choosing 100 percent grass-fed and finished beef, free-range chicken, and sustainably farmed, low-mercury fish.
  • Limit salt, food dyes, and preservatives (which happens naturally when you limit processed foods).

4. Carve out time for daily stress-reduction activities.

Traumatic events and ongoing stress are very real triggers for inflammatory diseases. In our go-go-go world, we’re always rushing; we can’t miss this deadline or that meeting, and we very rarely take the time to sit back, relax, and let our minds reset. Diet and stress are two root causes of a damaged gut, inflammation, and chronic disease, so it’s no surprise that in order to heal your arthritis naturally, you must take time to practice your favorite stress reduction activities daily. I recommend meditation, yoga, long walks through nature, and journaling to ease the mind.

My upcoming book, Healing Arthritis, talks all this and more, and offers a step-by-step, two-week plan to get to the bottom of the disease, reduce inflammation, and heal your joint pain—once and for all.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more. If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

orthopedic doctors, new mexico, albuquerque

Why Finger Joints Click, Snap, and Pop

Article Featured on VeryWell | By Jonathan Cluett, MD

Rest assured that the most common causes of finger popping is not a problem at all. Many people can make their fingers pop, often called cracking their knuckles. The sound you hear is thought to be caused by air bubbles moving in the fluid that surrounds your joints. When there is no pain associated with finger popping, it is seldom a problem and really harmless. That being said, if your noisy finger joints are associated with pain or swelling, it’s good to see your doctor for an evaluation. Read more

best orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

4 Things You’re Doing That Are Ruining Your Joints

Article by Cassie Shortsleeve | Found on Prevention.com

It used to be that joint replacements were a problem for older people. But today orthopedic surgeons are seeing people in their 40s, 50s, or younger. In fact, surgeons at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City say the number of people younger than 60 going under the knife is up at least 15% in the last 2 years. Plus, data from the National Center for Health Statistics finds the number of hip replacements more than doubled in a 10-year span, skyrocketing by 205% in people ages 45 to 54.

Surgeons attribute the rise to people wanting to stay active while they age, says Calin Moucha, MD, chief of adult reconstruction and joint replacement surgery at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Today’s implants also last longer than they once did, sometimes up to 40 years, he says. This means joint replacements are now an option at a younger age, since physicians aren’t as worried about having to replace them.

But while the surgeries are effective, we’d all prefer to skip a trip to the hospital, right? Here, the top mistakes we all make when it comes to our joints—and how to stay out of harm’s way.

You’re a runner and only a runner.

Moucha says that many patients seeking joint replacement are in good cardiovascular health, but not necessarily good physical health. If you’re running marathons or triathlons only, you might have imbalances when it comes to muscle strength and flexibility. And this, paired with repetitive trauma over time, could lead to arthritis, he notes, causing your joints to wear away.

“It’s important to cross-train,” says Moucha. Giving certain muscle groups (like the ones you use on long, slow jogs) a break once or twice a week while activating new muscles (like the ones you might use sprinting) can fend off injury, he notes. (You should consider working these strength-training moves into your exercise program.)

You let your weight go.

When you run, your knee joints carry 7 to 9 times your body weight, according to Moucha. While your body can handle this—some research suggests that runners aren’t at an increased risk for issues like osteoarthritis—it’s important to keep the scale in check. “From a biomechanical standpoint, increased weight is a lot of stress,” Moucha says. In fact, research out of the UK finds that overweight people are at a 40% or higher increased risk of a knee replacementdown the line compared to those at normal weights. The link was even stronger in younger people.

You skip stretching.

The key to joint health? Achieving a good balance between strength and flexibility, says Moucha. “As you get older, you need to spend as much time, if not more time, stretching than strengthening.” Why? Because the more candles on the birthday cake, the less flexible your muscles become, and flexible muscles help keep joints mobile.

You push yourself beyond your limits in yoga.

Intense workouts like HIIT and mud runs aren’t the only way to injure your joints. While yoga and Pilates are great ways to boost flexibility and strength, anything extreme when it comes to range of motion—like reaching for that pose your body’s not quite ready for—can put you at risk for a joint injury, notes Moucha. “When you create range of motion extremes, you can create bony spurs (projections along a bone’s edges) that may predispose you to arthritis,” he says. Your best bet isn’t to skip yoga but rather to stick with the modifications that work for you, and give yourself time before trying anything you might not be ready for.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

best, orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

Children Can Develop Juvenile Arthritis

Article by Carol Eustice | Featured on VeryWell

When most people think of arthritis, they don’t associate it with children. The most common misconception about arthritis is that it is an old person’s disease. In reality, arthritis affects people of all ages, including about 300,000 American children.

In young people and children under the age of 16, arthritis is classified differently than in adults. The course of the disease in children is usually different than in adults. Read more

new mexico, orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

Collagen in Cartilage Tissues Behaves Like Liquid Crystals in a Smart Phone Screen

Found on MedicalNewsToday

Cartilage in our joints contains collagen which behaves a bit like the liquid crystals on a smart phone screen, according to researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

The collagen changes its crystallinity in response to physical forces, so the ordered arrangement in collagen molecules of the cartilage in our knees may be flipping from one structural state to another with every step we take. Read more

orthopedic medicine clinic, albuquerque

Knee Arthritis Is On The Rise Among Young Athletes. Are You At Risk?

Article by Leigh Weingus | MindBodyGreen

Arthritis—more specifically, knee arthritis—is on the rise in the United States. According to a new study of more than 2,500 skeletons, some dating back 6,000 years, the prevalence of knee arthritis has nearly doubled since 1940.

In an age when many of us rely on exercise to release stress and boost happiness, this startling statistic may send you straight from a nearby running path to your couch with a bowl of popcorn and a new season of your favorite Netflix show. But take heart: There’s a lot you can do to protect yourself from arthritis. Read more

new mexico, orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

Certain Occupations Linked to an Increased Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis

Article Found on MedicalNewsToday

New research indicates that certain occupations may put workers at an elevated risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. The findings, which appear in Arthritis Care & Research, suggest that work-related factors, such as noxious airborne agents, may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Read more

People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Are at Increased Risk of Joint Damage in the Neck

People With Rheumatoid Arthritis Are at Increased Risk of Joint Damage in the Neck

Yet the condition called cervical myelopathy can progress with few symptoms.

Article By Maureen Donohue | Featured on US News

If you have rheumatoid arthritis, you’re well-acquainted with its ability to wreak extensive joint damage and destruction. This erosive process is typically all but impossible to ignore, causing the joints to become painful, swollen, tender and warm to the touch. If left untreated or if there is poor response to treatment, the erosion can lead to disabling and even crippling joint deformation.

RA damages the joints by producing inflammation of the synovium, the membrane that lines the joints. Chronic inflammation of the synovium causes fluid to accumulate in the joints, irritating the bones and causing the supporting ligaments to stretch and lose their elasticity and strength.
Read more