Everything You Need to Know About Hip Pain Caused by Running

Everything You Need to Know About Hip Pain Caused by Running

Hip pain is a common injury that plagues many athletes, especially us runners. But determining what’s causing your pain can be tricky. If you’re experiencing hip pain, we’ve got everything you need to know about hip injuries, including how to treat and prevent them. But first, here’s a quick refresher on hip anatomy:

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What is joint replacement surgery?

Original Article: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


What is joint replacement surgery?

Joint replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased parts of a joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts.

Replacing a joint can reduce pain and help you move and feel better. Hips and knees are replaced most often. Other joints that can be replaced include the shoulders, fingers, ankles, and elbows.

Points To Remember About Joint Replacement Surgery

  • Joint replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased parts of a joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts.
  • The goals of joint replacement surgery are to relieve pain, help the joint work better, and improve walking and other movements.
  • Risks of problems after joint replacement surgery are much lower than they used to be.
  • An exercise program can reduce joint pain and stiffness.
  • Wearing away of the joint surface may become a problem after 15 to 20 years.

Why may joint replacement surgery be needed?

Joints may need to be replaced when they are damaged from:

  • Arthritis
  • Years of use
  • Disease

Your doctor will likely first suggest other treatments to reduce pain and help you move better, such as:

  • Walking aids, such as a cane or walker
  • An exercise program
  • Physical therapy
  • Medications

Sometimes the pain remains and makes daily activities hard to do. In this case, your doctor may order an x-ray to look at the joint. If the x-ray shows damage and your joint hurts, you may need a joint replacement.


What happens during joint replacement surgery?

During joint replacement your doctors will:

An illustration showing a hip prosthesis that is used in hip replacement surgery.
Hip Replacement Location
  • Give you medicine so you won’t feel pain. The medicine may block the pain only in one part of the body, or it may put your whole body to sleep.
  • Replace the damaged joint with a new man-made joint.
  • Move you to a recovery room until you are fully awake or the numbness goes away.


What can I expect after joint replacement surgery?

With knee or hip surgery, you will probably need to stay in the hospital for a few days. If you are elderly or have additional disabilities, you may then need to spend several weeks in an intermediate-care facility before going home. You and your team of doctors will determine how long you stay in the hospital.

After hip or knee replacement, you will often stand or begin walking the day of surgery. At first, you will walk with a walker or crutches. You may have some temporary pain in the new joint because your muscles are weak from not being used. Also, your body is healing. The pain can be helped with medicines and should end in a few weeks or months.

Physical therapy can begin the day after surgery to help strengthen the muscles around the new joint and help you regain motion in the joint. If you have your shoulder joint replaced, you can usually begin exercising the same day of your surgery! A physical therapist will help you with gentle, range-of-motion exercises. Before you leave the hospital, your therapist will show you how to use a pulley device to help bend and extend your arm.


What are the complications of joint replacement surgery?

Complications after joint replacement surgery are much lower than they used to be. When problems do occur, most are treatable. Problems could include:

  • Infection.
  • Blood clots.
  • Loosening of the joint.
  • Ball of the new joint comes out of its socket.
  • Wear on joint replacements.
  • Nerve and blood vessel injury.

New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Hip Pain: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, and More

Why Does My Hip Hurt? 8 Causes of Hip Pain

The hip joint can withstand repeated motion and a fair amount of wear and tear. This ball-and-socket joint — the body’s largest — fits together in a way that allows for fluid movement.

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orthopaedic health clinic, albuquerque

Worried about breaking a hip? There might be something better than calcium.

Article by Sara Chodosh | Found on Popsci

Vitamin supplement companies want you to believe their products stave off disease. They can save you from heart attacks and broken bones and common colds. Or at least they say they can. But too often, those claims aren’t based on scientific studies, and consumers are left either mislead or unsure of what can actually help them.

Luckily, we have a panel of people whose job is to evaluate the evidence for interventions like vitamin supplements. They’re called the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, and they just released their latest judgment: calcium and vitamin D probably don’t help the elderly stave off broken bones. The one thing that they think will do the trick? Exercise.

Here’s what you need to know.

Just the key facts

Lots of older people are worried about falling, and though breaking a hip is now a cliché, it’s also a serious problem for elderly Americans. Alex Krist, a leading member of the USPSTF, noted in a recent interview with the journal JAMA that there are about two million fractures a year, and that those people who fracture their hips often end up being unable to walk again. What’s more, he notes that “more than half require assistance with daily activities, and 20 to 30 percent die within a year of their fracture.” This is why it’s so important to understand which interventions really work to prevent falls and fractures.

But when the USPSTF looked at the studies that have been done investigating whether calcium supplements, vitamin D pills, or both combined had any positive effect, they found evidence that lower doses did absolutely nothing. They now recommend against taking between 400 IU vitamin D (standard pills are often around 2000 IU) or 1000 mg of calcium. As for higher doses, there just wasn’t enough evidence to make a recommendation either way. Calcium supplements did seem to increase the likelihood of kidney stones, especially at high doses, so it’s possible taking more would be harmful. Krist also noted that too much calcium can build up inside arteries, increasing risk of vascular disease in the process.

It’s important to note here that this is all only true for adults who aren’t at high risk of osteoporosis, which is a weakening of bones that makes them brittle. Those who are at high risk would benefit from added calcium and potentially also from vitamin D, which helps to metabolize calcium inside your body.

Since falls are still a huge problem for the elderly, though, the USPSTF also examined which interventions could actually work. After all, there were 29 million falls in 2015 alone, and 33,000 deaths resulting from those falls. Vitamin D did nothing. Neither did multifactorial interventions, which would entail preparing a plan for nutrition, mobility exercises, and so on for individual patients. The thing that actually does work is exercise. It was only a modest amount, but it helped even those elderly adults who were at high risk of falling. Exercise reduced the relative risk of a fall to 0.89 (compared to a risk of 1.0 without exercise), and reduced the risk of injurious falls to 0.81 (again, down from a default risk of 1.0). The type of exercise varied a lot between all the studies the USPSTF looked at, but generally included three sessions per week of balance/functional training, resistance work, and flexibility components.

One important caveat

In an accompanying editorial to these USPSTF recommendations, David Reuben, a geriatric specialist at UCLA who wasn’t involved in the report, notes that it’s possible some vitamin-based supplements actually could help—it’s just that people don’t take them regularly enough. He points out that in one of the key studies, if you looked only at the people who took at least 80 percent of their supplements you could see a 29 percent reduction in hip fractures.

Of course, if people aren’t able to stick to a vitamin regimen—even one prescribed for a clinical trial—it may be useless to prescribe it as an intervention anyway.

The upshot

If you aren’t at high risk for osteoporosis: don’t bother with vitamins! The evidence all says that you’re unlikely to see any benefit—unless you have a deficiency—and you could end up with a whole new set of problems if you take too much.

If you are at high risk for osteoporosis: go talk to your doctor first, but you’d likely benefit from calcium supplements, possibly alongside vitamin D pills.

Either way: get some exercise! Krist says he tells all his patients (he’s a practicing physician, as well as being on the USPSTF) to at least get out and walk for 30 minutes several times a week, but notes this can be difficult for his older patients who are too scared of falling. He tries to get those people into some kind of regimented program that makes them feel safer, and aims for them to train three times a week.

Resistance and strength training help build muscles that are important for all your daily activities. Walking, standing up from a chair, even just sitting down—you can only help yourself out by getting regular workouts. And apparently, your bones will thank you.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Exercises That Are Easy On Your Joints

Exercises That Are Easy On Your Joints

Having rheumatoid arthritis doesn’t give you a pass to escape working out. In fact, regular exercise can keep your joints and muscles strong. It can also improve your heart health. That’ll make you better equipped to deal with complications that may crop up.

Other benefits of regular exercise include:

  • Less pain
  • More stability in your joints
  • More energy
  • Improved physical function and performance
  • Better bone health
  • Improved quality of life

Stretches

To ease joint stiffness and widen your range of motion, you need to stretch your muscles. Morning is a good time for gentle stretching or yoga. It’s also a good idea any time before exercise.

Leg/hamstring stretch: While standing, lean forward as far as you comfortably can and reach toward your toes. Make sure you bend your knees a little to keep your legs soft. Hold it for 10-20 seconds.

Finger/wrist stretch: Bend your fingers forward, then backward, holding each stretch for 10–20 seconds each time. Then do the same with your hand to stretch your wrist muscles.

Cross-body arm stretch: Put your arm across the front of your body and gently hold it for 10-20 seconds, then switch to the other arm. Next, reach up to the sky with one arm and then the other, tilting each arm slightly over your head to stretch your shoulders.

Neck stretches: Drop your head forward gently, and then roll it slowly toward one shoulder and back toward the other.

Yoga Poses

Cobra: Lie face-down on the floor, keeping your toes pointed away from you. Press your palms into the floor and slowly raise your upper body. Keep your elbows close to your side.

Extended leg balance: While standing, put all your weight on one foot. Use a chair or table for support and slowly lift your leg and hold it with one leg on the outside of your knee. For an even better stretch, rotate your leg out to the side from that position and hold.

Seated spinal twist: Sit up tall in a chair and put your hand on the outside of the opposite thigh. Gently twist in the direction of your arm and hold. Then, switch to the other side.

Strength Exercises

RA can slowly take away muscle mass. So, it’s important to work out your muscles to help them stay strong.

If you have swollen joints, you can do isometric exercises. They hold your muscles in one place. They also don’t make you move your joints.

If your joints aren’t swollen, isotonic exercises (movements that work against resistance, like weightlifting) are good for building up muscles.

Talk to your doctor before you start any kind of strength training.

Abdominal contractions: To do this isometric exercise, lie on your back and put your hands on your stomach muscles. Lift your head and hold it. You can continue this exercise by squeezing the muscles that lifted your head without actually picking it up, too.

Palm press: This is isometric, too. Hold your hands so they face each other. One hand should have fingertips up and the other should have fingertips down. Press your palms together and hold.

Bicep lifts: While you sit in a chair with your arms resting on your thighs palms up, hold light weights in your hands. Then, raise them toward your shoulders, bending at the elbow.

Seated knee lift: With a resistance band over your legs in a seated position, raise one leg slowly, then switch sides.

Exercises for Endurance

Your heart muscle needs a workout just like your biceps or quads do. Aerobic exercises raise your breathing and heart rates. Your best bets are exercises that get your blood pumping and are easy on your joints.

Walking: Daily walks are an easy way to get into the exercise groove. Start with slow and short strolls if you’re new to regular exercise. Then work up to longer, faster walks as you get stronger. Be sure to stretch before you start and after you finish. Drink plenty of water, too.

Cycling: A stationary bike takes away your risk of a fall. Again, start slowly if you’re a beginner, and go faster as you get better.

Swimming: Water workouts are great when you have RA. They take weight off your joints. They also raise your heart rate. Water also acts as resistance against your muscles. That can make you stronger.

You can swim laps or join a water aerobics class. Use water weights for some more muscle work.

new mexico, orthopedic doctors, albuquerque

Childhood Obesity a Major Link to Hip Diseases

Article Found on Science Daily

New research from the University of Liverpool, published in the Archives of Disease in Childhood journal, shows a strong link between childhood obesity and hip diseases in childhood.

Significant hip deformities affect around 1 in 500 children. Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disease of adolescence. The condition always requires surgery, can cause significant pain, and often leads to a hip replacement in adolescence or early adulthood. Read more

orthopaedic doctors, Albuquerque

Common Hip Injuries in Kids

Article by Kevin Shea | Found on StopSportsInjuries.org

Pediatric athletes are subject to several different acute hip injuries. These injuries include problems around the growth plate and around the femur and pelvis. In some cases, acute symptoms can develop in association with previous hip conditions. Two common hip injuries are discussed below. Read more

10 Ways to Protect Your Joints

By Mark Barroso | Found on Men’s Fitness

Joint pain can be a major issue when you’re working out and playing sports.

And while complaining about a bad back or stiff hips might typically be considered a sign of old age, it’s a frequent problem with Regardless of age, it’s time to start taking care your joints so you can enjoy life, and training, to the fullest.

Stiffness is only one condition that can result from a lack of joint care. Strains, sprains, dislocations, and arthritis are four more things you want to avoid throughout your strength andconditioning career. These four conditions are common in weight-bearing joints: knees, ankles, shoulders, elbows, and wrists. The good news is that with proper care, you can avoid joint injuries using a variety of training and lifestyle principles so that you’re always improving in the gym.

To learn how to work out pain and injury-free, we asked orthopedic surgeon Ron Noy, M.D., and Michael Camp, D.P.T., C.S.C.S., P.E.S., for ways to increase training longevity. Follow these 10 expert joint-saving tips to improve athletic performanceand stay functional throughout life.

Balance Low and High-Impact Cardio

High-impact cardio, such as running, plyometrics, and agility drills, is a great tool for activating fast-twitch muscle fibers. However, too much impact can cause stress and potential damage. “Balancing low-impact exercises with your impact activities to strengthen the muscles will help protect your joints,” says Noy. “Muscle strength across the joint is what stabilizes and protects it.”

Elliptical machines, stationary bikes, rowing machines, treadmill walking, and swimming are examples of low-impact cardio that will provide continued muscle strengthening, and aerobic and fat-burning benefits while minimizing stress, says Camp.

Increase Flexibility

Stretching, whether it is dynamic or static, maintains range of motion around joints.

“When a joint is stiff, it can alter the stresses seen during activities and it’s more prone to swelling, which can weaken the muscles protecting the joint,” says Noy.

Warm up all major muscle groups prior to exercise and stretch afterward to increase flexibility.

Avoid Behind-the-Neck Presses

Moving your hands and arms behind the plane of your shouldersduring a weightlifting exercise, like a behind-the-neck overhead press or a behind-the-neck lat pulldown may place the shoulders in an unstable condition. And that instability may lead to injury.

“With both of these movements, your shoulders are in an externally rotated position,” says Camp. “Most people have limited shoulder joint mobility in addition to poor muscle flexibility, so they get hurt performing these movements. There are safer and more effective exercises to perform, so take them out of your routine.”

Get Nutrition in Check

Minimizing inflammatory responses and excess body fat are two ways to ensure healthy muscles and joints.

“Diets that are more alkaline have been shown to improve your energy and help lower inflammation,” says Camp. “Foods such as berries, avocados, ginger, apples, dates, kale, spinach, and papaya are important to include in your diet.”

Noy adds that a diet low in saturated fat and processed foods can be beneficial. Also opt for fish, vegetables, fruits (cherries, apples, pineapple), whole grains, nuts, and legumes.

Supplement Up

Recommended for treatment of osteoarthritis, the joint supplements chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine, and hyaluronic acid have been shown in medical studies to be beneficial for joint health, says Noy. Some joint supplements have a combination of these ingredients for maximum joint health and overall energy.

Wear the Right Shoes

Regardless of the activity, shoes should provide cushioning, stability, and comfort while being flexible. Camp says the arches of your feet can be high, normal, or non-existent and knowing this information is crucial for selecting a training shoe. Also, knowing your foot strike pattern, whether it’s overpronation, underpronation or neutral, is necessary for finding the right shoe.

For running, the main factor is the compression ability, which is typically reduced at 300-500 miles. At this point, or about every six months, it’s time to replace your running shoes because worn shoes cause abnormal stresses on weight-bearing joints.

Consult a podiatrist to analyze your gait pattern and get the perfect fit for whatever the task at hand.

Maintain Proper Posture

If you have to sit, practice good posture.

“Poor sitting posture can lead to tightened, compromised muscles, and eventually back pain,” says Camp. “The vertebral discs have poor nutritional blood supply when your body is static. Getting up and moving around every hour to stretch and move is necessary to combat these affects and reduce any spinal pain.”

For the right sitting posture, Camp suggests lower back support. “Setting up your desk so your workstation is close to you, an maintaining angles of 90 degrees for your elbows, hips, and knees have been found to be best,” he says. “Having a chair with low back support is ideal, and if you do not have one, roll up a pillow or bath towel and place it behind your low back.”

Listen to Your Body

Avoid being overzealous and know when it’s time to stop a certain movement–it can mean the difference between major performance improvement and a dislocated joint or other injury.

“If you have pain during an exercise or sport, stop and rest,” says Noy. “If it persists, consult a doctor to check out why so you are not causing preventable permanent damage. Sometimes ‘no pain, no gain’ can lead to problems if not addressed early enough.”

Reduce Stress

Controlling stress is imperative to decreasing levels of the stress hormone cortisol, which can drive down the production of collagen, a compound necessary for healthy joints.

Camp suggests that practicing diaphragmatic breathing for 5 to 10 minutes, which can lower your stress hormone levels. Or try yoga, a low-impact exercise for overall health and flexibility.

Already Injured? Brace Yourself

If you’ve already injured a joint, ligament, tendon or muscle, a protective brace can help reduce inflammation in that area.

“While there is controversy around whether braces can prevent injuries, such as ACL tears, they may provide benefits when you are working through an injury or have damage already,” says Noy. “Compressive sleeves can provide warmth, combat swelling, and provide biofeedback, and some braces can help unload an injured part of a joint.”


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Joints Achy? Don’t Blame Mother Nature

Article by Robert Preidt | Featured on MedlinePlus

You might want to think twice the next time you’re ready to blame the weather for your aches and pains, researchers say.

Some people swear that changes in humidity, temperature, air pressure and the like trigger back pain and arthritis. But a team at the George Institute for Global Health in Newtown, Australia said it found no evidence to support that theory.

“The belief that pain and inclement weather are linked dates back to Roman times. But our research suggests this belief may be based on the fact that people recall events that confirm their pre-existing views,” said Chris Maher, director of the institute’s musculoskeletal division.

The study included nearly 1,350 Australians with either lower back pain or osteoarthritis of the knee. The study participants’ pain flare-ups were compared with weather data.

There was no association between back pain/knee arthritis and temperature, humidity, air pressure, wind direction or precipitation, the investigators found.

“Human beings are very susceptible so it’s easy to see why we might only take note of pain on the days when it’s cold and rainy outside, but discount the days when they have symptoms but the weather is mild and sunny,” Maher explained in an institute news release.

Maher is also a professor of physiotherapy at the University of Sydney.

Back pain affects up to one-third of people worldwide at any one time. Nearly 10 percent of men and 18 percent of women over the age of 60 have osteoarthritis, the study authors said in background notes.

Manuela Ferreira, an associate professor of medicine who led the osteoarthritis research, said, “People who suffer from either of these conditions should not focus on the weather as it does not have an important influence on your symptoms and it is outside your control.

“What’s more important is to focus on things you can control in regards to managing pain and prevention,” he concluded.

Ferreira is a senior research fellow at the George Institute and the Institute of Bone and Joint Research at the University of Sydney.

SOURCE: George Institute for Global Health, news release, Jan. 10, 2017


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions ó such as sports injuries and fractures ó to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

My Hip Hurts Where's the pain?

My Hip Hurts: Where’s the Pain?

Cathy Fieseler | Featured on Runners World

Previous articles have discussed problems in the pelvis, including piriformis syndrome, sports hernia, osteitis pubis and sacroiliac (SI) dysfunction. This article will review problems in the hip joint and surrounding tissues.

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