16 Ways You May Be Hurting Your Joints

16 Ways You May Be Hurting Your Joints

Your joints link bones together so you can bend your knees, wiggle your hips, and move your body. Learn how you might be preventing your joints from working their best.

Carry Extra Weight

Your joints, which link your bones together, are sensitive to heavy loads. Every pound on your frame puts 4 pounds of stress on your knees. It also strains your back, hips, and feet. That causes wear and tear that can lead to damage, aches, and pain. Being overweight also triggers inflammation. That can make all your joints, including in your hands, stiff, painful, and swollen.

Text Too Much

‘Texting thumb’ is a real thing. Your tendons can get irritated and lock your thumb in a curled position. All that looking down at your phone is just as bad for your neck and shoulders, too. Every inch your head drops forward raises the load on your muscles. If you bend your neck so far that your chin touches your chest, it’s as if your neck has to support the weight of 5 heads instead of just one.

Steep Price of High Heels

They might look fab, but the higher they rise, the more your weight tips forward. Your thigh muscles have to work harder to keep your knee straight, which can cause pain. When heels go up, so does the twisting force in your knees. If you wear them every day, you boost your odds for osteoarthritis. That’s when the bones and the cushioning between the bones break down.

Wear the Wrong Shoes

Worn-out shoes don’t support your feet and ankles enough. That’ll throw your knees, hips, and back out of whack. Also, make sure your sneakers are right for your sport. High tops for basketball, for example, can protect your ankles from sprains. But don’t go overboard. Too much cushion or arch support means your foot can’t move naturally, which could keep you in a cycle of pain.

Crack Your Knuckles

That satisfying pop comes from tiny bubbles bursting in the fluid around your joints. Or from ligaments snapping against bone. Despite what annoyed adults might have warned you, it doesn’t cause arthritis. Still, it might be smart to stop. One study showed that this habit may cause your hands to swell and weaken your grip.

Lug a Big Bag

Whether it’s a purse, backpack, or messenger bag, packing too much can cause neck and shoulder pain. Heavy weight on one shoulder throws off your balance and your walk. If you tend to carry things only on one side, the constant pull overstretches your muscles and tires out your joints. If you do that every day, your body’s going to let you know loud and clear.

Use Wrong Muscles for the Job

When you put too much load on little muscles, your joints pay the price. If you need to open a heavy door, push with your shoulder instead of your fingers. When you lift something off the floor, bend at your knees and push up with your strong leg muscles. When you carry something, hold it close to you in the palms of your hands instead of stressing your fingers.

Sleep on Your Stomach

It might help with snoring, but not so much with the rest of your body. Lying on your tummy pushes your head back, which compresses your spine. Your head also will face in one direction for longer stretches than if you sleep on your back. All that puts pressure on other joints and muscles.

Skip Stretching

You don’t need to be a yogi, but regular stretching can help strengthen your muscles and tendons. It also can make them more flexible. That allows your joints to move more easily and helps the muscles around them work better. That’s key to healthy and stable joints.

Skimp on Strength Training

Once you turn 40, your bones start to get a little thinner and more likely to break. If you build muscle with strength training, it slows bone loss and triggers new growth. So you not only get stronger muscles, but denser bones, too. Together, they stabilize your joints so you’re less likely to get hurt.

Smoke and Chew Tobacco

Here’s another reason to quit: Your joints will thank you. Nicotine from cigarettes and chewing tobacco cuts down on blood flow to your bones and to the cushioning discs in your back. It limits how much bone-building calcium your body can take in. It also breaks down estrogen, a hormone you need for bone health. And it slows new growth that thickens bones. All that makes your joints weaker and your hips more likely to break.

Don’t Get Quality ZZZs

You may wonder how poor sleep can affect your joints. One study found that people with arthritis felt more pain after restless nights. That made them take a closer look. One theory is that when you don’t sleep well, it triggers inflammation in your body. That might lead to joint problems over time. More research is needed, but in the meantime, it sure won’t hurt to get good shut-eye.

Slouch and Slump

Your body’s at its best when you work with it, not against it. That’s why posture matters. When you slump in your chair, it puts more stress on your muscles and joints and tires them out. It’s like always jamming on your car brakes when you could just ease down on the pedal instead. So keep your back straight and those shoulders back and down.

Ignore Pain

When you work out, you might think you just need to power through it. After all, no pain, no gain, right? It’s true that some muscle soreness is OK. But not if it lasts for days or if your muscles are swollen or too sore to move or to touch. Joint pain isn’t normal, so pay attention to it. If you think you overdid it, ease up on your exercises. If the pain won’t go away, check with your doctor.

Too Much Computer Time

It can literally be a pain in your neck — and your elbows, wrists, back, and shoulders. The problem isn’t just bad posture, but that you hold it for too long. That overworks your muscles. It also puts pressure on the discs in your back. If you’re in a soft chair, prop up your arms with cushions to take the load off your shoulders and your neck. Be sure to get up and move every hour.

Repeat Poor Form

When you run, bike, or play tennis, you use the same motions over and over. But if your form is bad, you’ll stress your body in all the wrong places. If you overload your muscles, it puts more pressure on your joints, and you can end up with an injury like tennis elbow.

 


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Relieving Arthritis Pain With Heat or Cold Therapy

Relieving Arthritis Pain With Heat or Cold Therapy

By Heidi Godman, Contributor  | Featured on US News

ARTHRITIS PAIN CAN BE disabling. Stiff, swollen, aching joints may keep you from doing the activities you love or the ones required to get through each day, like walking or dressing. While prescription medication and physical therapy are the first line of defense for addressing arthritis causes, an age-old home remedy – heat or cold therapy – may help reduce pain and improve range of motion. “It doesn’t change or improve arthritis, but it can provide symptom relief,” says Dr. M. Elaine Husni, a rheumatologist and physician scientist at Cleveland Clinic.

Read more

Healthy Joints for a Lifetime

Healthy Joints for a Lifetime

Article Featured on MedlinePlus

Remarkable advances are being made every day in the world of orthopedic health and disease treatment—our bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and related connective tissues. From reducing the crippling pain of arthritis to the miracle of knee and hip replacements, “musculoskeletal” research is changing how well—and how long—we can live an active, healthy life.

Most people take their bones and joints for granted—until something goes wrong with one or more of them. The human body has more than 200 bones and more than 200 joints that connect the bones.

“Almost every household in America is affected in some way by diseases of bones, joints, muscles, and skin,” says Stephen I. Katz, M.D., Ph.D., director of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS). It is NIAMS that is the nation’s research arm on these challenging conditions.

“Joint damage can happen to anyone at any age,” says Dr. Katz. “In fact, many of the diseases related to joints and bone problems affect women and minorities more severely. But there are steps you can take to help prevent or lessen the effects of joint damage.”

One of the most amazing options now is surgery to replace damaged joints. Almost half a million such hip or knee replacements occur in the United States each year. Here is an overview of the most common challenges and treatments.

Fast Facts

  • The most common joint problems come from arthritis and injuries. Arthritis literally means joint inflammation. Although joint inflammation describes a symptom or sign rather than a specific diagnosis, the term “arthritis” often refers to any disorder affecting the joints. These disorders fall within the broader category known as rheumatic diseases, of which there are more than 100 kinds, and are characterized by inflammation as well as loss of function of one or more connecting or supporting structures of the body.
  • More than 46 million people in the United States have arthritis or other rheumatic conditions. By the year 2020, this number is expected to reach 60 million. These diseases more frequently limit activity than do heart disease, cancer, or diabetes.
  • The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis. It is seen especially among older people and is sometimes called degenerative joint disease. In osteoarthritis, the surface layer of cartilage (the hard but slippery tissue that covers the ends of bones) breaks down and wears away, causing pain, swelling, and loss of joint motion.
  • About 435,000 Americans have a hip or knee replaced each year. Because of its structure and weight-bearing capacity, the knee is the most commonly injured joint. In the case of hip joint damage, osteoarthritis is the most common cause.
  • Young adults who have had a previous joint injury are more likely to develop osteoarthritis. Researchers are looking for ways to prevent cartilage breakdown after injury.

New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Stem Cell Clinics Sell Bogus Cures for Knee Pain

Stem Cell Clinics Sell Bogus ‘Cures’ for Knee Pain

By Dennis Thompson | Featured on WebMD

Stem cell clinics are charging big money for knee arthritis “cures” and making extravagant claims about their therapies, a new study contends. A same-day injection for one knee costs thousands of dollars at these centers, according to a consumer survey taken of clinics across the United States.

People are paying that kind of cash because two-thirds of stem cell clinics promise that their treatments work 80 to 100 percent of the time, researchers report. But there’s no medical evidence suggesting that any stem cell therapy can provide a lasting cure for knee arthritis, said study lead researcher Dr. George Muschler, an orthopedic surgeon with the Cleveland Clinic.

“There are claims made about efficacy [effectiveness] that aren’t supported by the literature,” Muschler said. “There’s a risk of charlatanism, and patients should be aware.”Stem cells have gained a reputation as a miracle treatment and potential cure for many ailments. The cells have the potential to provide replacement cells for any part of the body — blood, brain, bones or organs. As a result, a wave of stem cell centers have opened up around the country, offering cures for a variety of diseases, Muschler said.

“It’s very sexy to market yourself as a stem cell center, so there’s been a boom of centers, probably close to 600 now in the United States offering this therapy,” Muschler said. “But the truth is that the medical literature hasn’t quite caught up to the enthusiasm in the marketplace.”

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has expressed extreme skepticism over these centers, and in November the agency announced that it would crack down on clinics offering dangerous stem cell treatments. The “pie-in-the-sky” dream for knee arthritis patients is that a stem cell injection will produce fresh new protective cartilage in their joint, said Dr. Scott Rodeo, an orthopedic surgeon with the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City.

“The reality is they don’t do that. There is zero data to suggest that,” said Rodeo, who wasn’t involved with the study. “The idea these cells are going to regenerate cartilage — there’s zero data.”

At best, these injections might temporarily reduce pain and inflammation by prompting the release of soothing chemicals in the knee, Rodeo and Muschler said. To get an idea what stem cell centers are promising customers, Muschler and his colleagues called 273 U.S. clinics posing as a 57-year-old man with knee arthritis.The clinics were asked about same-day stem cell injections, how well they work and how much they cost. Of the 65 centers that provided pricing information, the average cost for a knee injection was $5,156, with prices ranging from $1,150 to $12,000, the researchers found. Fourteen centers charged less than $3,000 for a single injection, while 10 centers charged more than $8,000.

The 36 centers that provided information on effectiveness claimed an average effectiveness of 82 percent, the researchers said. Of them, 10 claimed that the injection worked 9 out of 10 times, and another 15 claimed 80 to 90 percent effectiveness. The findings were presented Tuesday at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons’ annual meeting, in New Orleans. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

“Patients are being told there’s an 80 percent likelihood of improvement, which is only 10 to 20 percent better than you’d expect from a placebo effect,” Muschler said. In fact, he suspects that the placebo effect is responsible for much of the improvement patients feel following a knee injection.

“People always show up to the doctor when they hurt,” Muschler said. “If I see a patient who has arthritis in their knee and I do nothing, there’s a very good chance they’re going to get better over the coming months, anyway. There’s this natural cycle of increasing and decreasing pain that’s present in the life of someone who has arthritis.”

That’s compounded by the fact that people expect to feel better after shelling out a load of cash, Muschler added. These centers generally provide three different types of treatment, only one of which actually has live stem cells involved, Muschler said.

One treatment injects the knee with platelet-rich plasma drawn from the patient’s own blood, while another uses a slurry produced from fetal tissue and fluid gathered after birth. Neither of these contains stem cells, but they are marketed as stem cell therapies, Muschler said.

A third option involves bone marrow taken from the patient and injected into the knee. This does contain a mixture of three types of stem cells, but “the evidence that you’re doing [your knees] a favor is still pretty weak in the literature,” Muschler said.People aren’t likely to be harmed by these injections, Rodeo said, but there’s not a lot of evidence that they’ll be helped. “Patients should go into it eyes wide open,” Rodeo said. “They’re paying a lot of money out of pocket, because these are not covered by insurers.” Knee arthritis sufferers would be better off trying many of the established options for reducing knee pain, Muschler and Rodeo said.

Losing weight is a “key factor,” Muschler said. “There’s very good evidence that if you are at a 5 on the pain scale and you lose 10 percent of your body weight, your pain will drop 2 points,” Muschler said. Patients also can use NSAIDs like aspirin or ibuprofen to reduce pain and swelling, get a steroid injection, or perform weight training to strengthen the muscles that support the knee, Muschler and Rodeo said.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

5 Best Low Impact Cardio Exercises for People with Bad Knees

5 Best Low Impact Cardio Exercises for People with Bad Knees

Article By Francesca Menato | Featured on Women’s Health

Anyone with a knee injury, new or old, will know how easy it is to feel it flair up with extreme cardio. Running, in particular, is very tough on the knees – so what exercises can you do to get the heart rate up, without hurting already bad knees?

We caught up with Lorraine Furmedge, Fitness First PT Ambassador, to find out the best workouts and exercises for bad knees.

Before you lace up your running shoes and risk another niggle, try these.

1. Swimming

If you’re on the search for cardio exercises for bad knees, head to the pool. Swimming provides a great workout that is low impact, versatile and burns calories fast. Whether you’re doing the butterfly or backstroke you’ll work all major muscle groups in your body including your glutes, abdominals and chest muscles.

Wondering which is the best stroke?

Freestyle, which tends to be the fastest stroke, can burn 100 calories every 10 minutes – more than jogging – but all of them will work your whole body.

2. Elliptical

Opt for an elliptical over a treadmill for minimal risk of knee injury. Your feet never leave the pedals, which means there is less of a chance to injure your knees, back, neck or hips. You’ll also get your heart rate up, making you work up a sweat! Increase the resistant to really test your endurance.

There’s a lot of discussion around which cardio machines burn more calories, and generally, the treadmill does tend to come out on top given you are moving whilst also supporting the full weight of your body but elliptical trainers are fantastic for getting in a great cardio workout with a bit more support.

With any form of exercise, you get out what you put in so it all depends on how hard you push and challenge yourself.

3. Stationary rowing

Rowing is a great way to burn calories without placing stress on your knee joints. Not only will you get a total body workout, you’ll also maximise your core strength with every pull.

Amp up the intensity by increasing the resistance while maintaining speed for a real cardiovascular challenge.

The more you train on a certain machine, the more stamina and strength your body will gain in that particular area, meaning the harder you have to work each time to continue challenging yourself.

If calorie burning is your main aim, switch up your routine and use a mixture of machines and freestyle training – it will keep your body guessing and will test you in different ways.

4. Cycling

Whether you prefer hitting a stationary bike indoors or riding your bicycle outside, you’ll get a fantastic fat-burning workout that will gradually improve your knee flexibility and strength.

To ensure you don’t put pressure on your knees, avoid hills and stick to a flat terrain. Raise your seat level slightly to decrease any pressure on your kneecap.

Wondering what resistance you should use? When it comes to cycling with resistance, there is no right or wrong answer.

Low resistance is great for those people who are just getting into fitness as it allows you to start building up your stamina without over-exerting yourself. Likewise, those suffering with knee injuries may find this an effective and low impact way of getting their regular exercise sessions in without causing further damage.

Medium and high resistance is more suited to those with higher fitness levels and works really well when it comes to building strength in your legs and lower body. If you’ve recently recovered from a knee injury consider using resistance to increase your strength and safeguard against any further damage.

To combine cardio and strength try some interval training and switch between low resistance sprints and medium-high resistance climbs.

Wondering about spin classes? Don’t fret. All good spin instructors will check for injuries before the class begins so let them know and they’ll be able to advise on how to best tackle the session.

Plus, the beauty of spin is that you can carry out the class at your own pace. Remember, you are in control and can adjust your pace according to your ability.

5. Step ups

For a low-impact cardio workout, turn to an aerobic step bench.

Step up onto the step with your right foot. Tap your left foot on the top of the step and then lower.

As you step up, your knee should be directly over your ankle to ensure you’re protecting your knees.

Repeat 10 times for a great calorie burn.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

orthopaedic doctors, new mexico

Healthy Aging: Preserving Your Bones and Joints

Whether you’re a young adult, baby boomer or senior, here’s what you can do now.

Article Featured on US News

PAUL SCHNEIDER, 90, OF Palm Harbor, Florida, starts his morning exercise with 100 situps. A couple golf matches a week, plus weight and aerobic workouts at his fitness club, also keep him flexible and strong.

Schneider stays slender and watches what he eats. He drinks water, not soda. He takes Tums for calcium, as well as fish oil and vitamin D supplements. He was never sedentary, either as a sales manager in the emerging computer industry or as a father of four. “I have fortunately – knock on wood – never broken a bone,” he says.

As aging conspires to chip away at your bone and joint health, experts explain what you can do to maintain these through every phase of life:

Start Early

Bone and joint health begin in childhood, says Dr. Sundeep Khosla, director of the Aging Bone, Muscle and Joint Program within the Mayo Clinic’s Kogod Center on Aging.

“Physical activity is important for loading the bones and helping them develop as strong as they can,” Khosla says. Parents can watch that kids don’t replace milk with sodas, thereby missing out on calcium. And it’s never too soon to discourage smoking, which can affect bone mass.

The adolescent growth spurt brings a marked rise in fractures, Khosla says. It’s believed when the skeleton is rapidly growing, an increased need for calcium may cause thinning, especially in delicate wrist bones. “So when these kids fall, they get wrist fractures,” he says.

If these fractures occur with mild injuries, like falling from a low height, that’s a sign kids have skeletal defects tied to low bone mass, Khosla says. “And that low bone mass tracks into young adulthood.”

Pillars of Bone Health

When it comes to healthy aging, Paul Schneider has an expert in his corner. His daughter, Dr. Diane Schneider,​ is a geriatrician, osteoporosis expert and author of “The Complete Book of Bone Health.”

Calcium, vitamin D, diet and exercise are the cornerstones of bone health, she says. Staying at a healthy weight is important: “You don’t want to be carrying around extra weight because that’s what’s going to start wearing out your hips and knees.”

What’s good for the bones isn’t necessarily good for the joints. “For your skeleton, you want weight-bearing exercises,” Schneider says. “But for your joints, weight-bearing exercises may also contribute to wearing them out.” She advises moderation and variety: If you’re a dedicated runner, for instance, work out with weights at the gym for a change.

Young Adult Challenges

“Your late 20s, early 30s is when you achieve what is called peak bone mass,” Schneider says. But college and career demands can disrupt health and exercise regimens, even for people who were active as teens.

Diet also changes for young adults, like drinking less milk. Schneider advises limiting caffeinated beverages – soda and coffee – particularly if your calcium intake is low. She recommends water instead. Alcohol consumption can affect bone health. “Moderate drinking, which would be one or two alcoholic beverages, is OK,” Schneider says. “More than that is too much.”

If you can’t cover the recommended calcium intake for your age group, Schneider says, either do a “menu makeover” to put calcium-rich food in your diet, or use a calcium supplement.

“Try to limit meals on the go,” she says. “They tend to be higher in sodium and carbohydrates and scant on vegetables.” And like alcohol, they can lead to putting on pounds.

Staying active isn’t always easy. “Try to schedule your exercise time and spend more time on your feet,” Schneider says. In the workplace, innovations like standing desks let employees sit less.

Maintain Bone Mass in Midlife

Middle age is a critical period for bone and joint health. After 50, calcium requirements for post-menopausal women rise from 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams,​ Schneider notes – but calorie requirements don’t. As metabolism slows, weight can creep up. “So women may need more time to maintain their fitness,” Schneider says.

Making time to exercise isn’t easy for the sandwich generation. Try working fitness into your day: strapping on a pedometer for 10,000 steps, parking farther from your building, taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

Exercises to strengthen muscles also help protect the joints they support, Schneider says, which is important when arthritis shows up in middle age.

“With women, of course, the menopausal transition is when you really start accelerating bone loss because of the hormonal level fluctuations,” she says. Men also experience hormonal changes, with both testosterone and estrogen, but their bone loss is more gradual and less marked, Schneider says.

Avoiding osteoporosis  the silent condition that eats away at bones, leaving them thin, weak and vulnerable to breaks – is paramount. The National Osteoporosis Foundation offers guidelines for when people should undergo a bone-density test (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry or DEXA scan) based on their age, gender and risk factors – such as family history, smoking and certain medications.

Senior Strong

Faye Strum, 75, a retired teacher in La Jolla, California, hasn’t let osteoporosis disrupt her active life. About 18 years ago, she learned she had the condition after undergoing a bone scan during a routine checkup. Until then, Strum had no idea her bones were at risk. “I am of small stature,” she says. With the diagnosis, “I didn’t want to lose any height. And I’ve always been active, so I wanted to keep my muscles strong.”

Strum has taken bone-building medications and safeguards her bones while staying active. “I do more specialized exercise. I take in plenty of calcium. And I’m careful in how much I do in terms of lifting,” she says. “I don’t pick up little grandchildren and hold them up high.” She continues to walk and play tennis, and attends a healthy-bone class twice a week at a nearby sport-and-health center, where she works out with weights and bands and does balance exercise. And she attends a weekly gentle-yoga class.

Balance and core-strength exercise such as yoga and Tai Chi reduce your risk of falls and resulting fractures, Schneider says.

Improve Your ‘Health Span’

It’s never too late to optimize your bone health, Khosla says. “There are now drugs – and more drugs on the horizon – that can build your bone back up,” he says. “So you can at least partially reverse the bone loss.”

His group is working to better understand the underlying causes of bone aging and pinpoint people at higher risk of fractures. While DEXA is an “excellent” diagnostic tool, he says, upcoming imaging tools can provide detailed information on bone structure. And researchers are working on new tests to determine the quality of a patient’s bone.

“While extending lifespan is important, it doesn’t really help if that lifespan you extend is full of disability and pain,” Khosla says. In the aging-research community, the newer concept is extending “health span,” he says. “So you may not necessarily extend the actual life from 95 or 100 or whatever. But within that time frame, you’ll have more years of the better quality of life and healthier life.”


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.