8 Ways to Prevent Knee Problems Before They Begin

8 Ways to Prevent Knee Problems Before They Begin

Article Featured on Active Implants

As the largest joint in your body, the knee is a common source of pain and injury. Protect your knees now, and they’ll keep you stepping strong for years to come. Here are some tips to help you keep your knees in tip-top shape.

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3 Lifestyle Choices for Healthier Knees

3 Lifestyle Choices for Healthier Knees

Article Featured on Active Implants

The knee is one of the largest, most complex joints in the human body and the most common joint injured. While several common causes for knee pain exist, many lifestyle choices may reduce pain and postpone or eliminate the need for knee surgery in the future. Here are 3 tips for maintaining healthy knees and a healthier life:

Take care of your overall health

Taking better care of your physical and mental health will not only make for a happier and more fulfilled life, but can also improve the strength of your knees. Studies have shown that ailments such as back pain and depression have been linked to knee pain, so making even the simplest of changes like strengthening your core and losing weight can help stave off the prospect of knee surgery. Did you know losing 10 pounds relieves about 40 pounds of pressure on your knees?

Drink more water

Water is not only vital to healthy bones and skin, it is also vital to knee health. The cartilage in our knees is made up of mostly water – up to 80 percent when we’re properly hydrated. But as we get older, the water content gets lower, resulting in unhealthy cartilage and possibly degenerative joint disease. Lack of water can also lead to dehydration, which can drain your energy and make you tired. So drink up! The Institute of Medicine recommends an adequate intake is roughly about 13 cups of total beverages a day for men, and 9 cups of total beverages a day for women.

Keep moving

Knee cartilage depends on movement to stay healthy and heal. Aim to be active up to 30 minutes a day, five days a week doing any of your favorite knee-safe activities like walking, yoga, swimming or low-impact aerobics. Consider adding in knee exercises to your routine, such as marching, sit to stand/stand to sit, hamstring curls, heel raises and squats for added knee strengthening.

Even after making these healthy lifestyle choices, you may still experience knee pain or injury. If your pain gets to the point that you are unable to enjoy your favorite activities or if it affects your quality of life, it’s time to see a doctor to determine the cause of pain and choose a treatment plan that’s right for you.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Combined Knee Ligament Injuries

Combined Knee Ligament Injuries

Article Featured on AAOS

The knee is the largest joint in your body and one of the most complex. It is also vital to movement. Your knee ligaments connect your thighbone to your lower leg bones. Knee ligament sprains or tears are a common sports injury.

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Seven Most Common Knee Injuries

Seven Most Common Knee Injuries

Article Featured on ReboundMD

The knee joint is one of the largest and most complex joints in the body. It is also one of the most important joints. Connecting the thigh bone to the shinbone, it plays an important role in supporting the body’s weight, and facilitating movement –allowing you to bend your knee.

Due to the complexity of the knee joint, it is susceptible to a number of different injuries. Some of the most common knee joint injuries include tears in the ligaments, tendons, and cartilage. The kneecap itself can also be fractured or dislocated.

Let’s look at some of the most common knee injuries. See how they are caused and the treatment that’s required to address them.

Fractures

The kneecap (patella) is a shield for your knee joint, and protects it from becoming injured or damaged during a fall. Because of this, the kneecap can become broken during a high impact fall or sports injury.

Kneecap fractures are a common yet serious injury that usually requires immobilization or in some cases surgery to correct.

Dislocations

Knee dislocations occur when the knee bones become out of place. This can occur after a major trauma such as a fall, car crash, or high-speed impact. It can also be caused by twisting the knee while one foot is firmly planted on the ground.

Dislocations require relocation. Sometimes the kneecap will spontaneously correct itself and return to the proper position. Other cases will require a mild sedative to allow the doctor to relocate the knee without causing too much discomfort. It generally takes about six weeks to fully heal from a dislocated knee.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is knee tissue that joins the upper and lower leg bones together and helps keep the knee stable.

The ACL can be torn if the lower leg extends forward too much or if the leg becomes twisted. ACL injuries are one of the most common types of knee injuries and account for about 40 percent of all sports-related injuries.

An ACL injury can range from a small tear in the ligament to a severe injury –when the ligament completely tears or becomes separated from the bone itself.

Treatment options for ACL injuries depend on the extent of the injury. Not all ACL injuries require surgery, however depending on various factors including the severity of the tear, surgery may be required. Physical rehabilitation is often recommended after an ACL injury.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries

The posterior cruciate ligament connects the femur bone to the shinbone and keeps the shinbone from moving too far back. As the name suggests, this ligament is located at the back of the knee.

A posterior cruciate ligament injury occurs when trauma occurs to the knee –this can happen in sports when the player lands on a bent knee. If the damage is only to the posterior cruciate ligament –then treatment is generally non-surgical. But if there are a combination of injuries such as a dislocated knee and multiple torn ligaments, then surgery may be required.

Collateral Ligament Injuries

The collateral ligament is one of the four major ligaments in the knee.

A collateral ligament injury is a common sports-related injury. This ligament can easily be torn when the lower leg is forced sideways.

Surgery may not be required if the collateral ligament has been torn. However, if other structures in the knee are injured at the same time then surgery is generally recommended.

Meniscal Tears

The meniscus is the piece of cartilage between the knee joint that helps absorb the shock that occurs when running or playing sports. The pieces help cushion the joint and keep it stable.

Unfortunately though, meniscus tears are common in sports that require jumping –like volleyball and soccer, as well as contact sports like football. When a person changes direction suddenly while running, the meniscus can tear.

Surgery may be required, depending on the extent of the injury and severity of the tear.

Tendon Tears

The tendon in the knee, known as the patellar tendon –works together with the knee muscles in the front of the thigh to help straighten the leg. While tears in the patellar tendon are most common among middle-aged people and those who play running or jumping sports –it is possible for anyone to tear their tendon.

A complete tear is considered a disabling injury and requires surgery to regain complete function. However most tears are only partial tears and require rest and physical therapy to help facilitate healing.

If you have experienced a knee injury or are experiencing knee pain, it’s important to see an orthopedic specialist as soon as possible. Your orthopedist will be able to make a diagnosis and recommend treatment options to help get you back on track as soon as possible.

Common Knee Injuries

What to do if you think your joint replacement is infected

Article Featured on AAOS

Knee and hip replacements are two of the most commonly performed elective operations. For the majority of patients, joint replacement surgery relieves pain and helps them to live fuller, more active lives.No surgical procedure is without risks, however. A small percentage of patients undergoing hip or knee replacement (roughly about 1 in 100) may develop an infection after the operation.Joint replacement infections may occur in the wound or deep around the artificial implants. An infection may develop during your hospital stay or after you go home. Joint replacement infections can even occur years after your surgery.

This article discusses why joint replacements may become infected, the signs and symptoms of infection, treatment for infections, and preventing infections.

Description

Any infection in your body can spread to your joint replacement.

Infections are caused by bacteria. Although bacteria are abundant in our gastrointestinal tract and on our skin, they are usually kept in check by our immune system. For example, if bacteria make it into our bloodstream, our immune system rapidly responds and kills the invading bacteria.

However, because joint replacements are made of metal and plastic, it is difficult for the immune system to attack bacteria that make it to these implants. If bacteria gain access to the implants, they may multiply and cause an infection.

Despite antibiotics and preventive treatments, patients with infected joint replacements often require surgery to cure the infection.

Total knee implants

Examples of total knee implants. Joint replacement implants are typically made of metal alloys and strong, durable plastic called polyethylene.

Cause

A total joint may become infected during the time of surgery, or anywhere from weeks to years after the surgery.

The most common ways bacteria enter the body include:

  • Through breaks or cuts in the skin
  • During major dental procedures (such as a tooth extraction or root canal)
  • Through wounds from other surgical procedures

Some people are at a higher risk for developing infections after a joint replacement procedure. Factors that increase the risk for infection include:

  • Immune deficiencies (such as HIV or lymphoma)
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Peripheral vascular disease (poor circulation to the hands and feet)
  • Immunosuppressive treatments (such as chemotherapy or corticosteroids)
  • Obesity

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of an infected joint replacement include:

  • Increased pain or stiffness in a previously well-functioning joint
  • Swelling
  • Warmth and redness around the wound
  • Wound drainage
  • Fevers, chills and night sweats
  • Fatigue

Doctor Examination

When total joint infection is suspected, early diagnosis and proper treatment increase the chances that the implants can be retained. Your doctor will discuss your medical history and conduct a detailed physical examination.

Tests

Imaging tests. X-rays and bone scans can help your doctor determine whether there is an infection in the implants.

Laboratory tests. Specific blood tests can help identify an infection. For example, in addition to routine blood tests like a complete blood count (CBC), your surgeon will likely order two blood tests that measure inflammation in your body. These are the C-reactive Protein (CRP) and the Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR). Although neither test will confirm the presence of infection, if either or both of them are elevated, it raises the suspicion that an infection may be present. If the results of these tests are normal, it is unlikely that your joint is infected.

Additionally, your doctor will analyze fluid from your joint to help identify an infection. To do this, he or she uses a needle to draw fluid from your hip or knee. The fluid is examined under a microscope for the presence of bacteria and is sent to a laboratory. There, it is monitored to see if bacteria or fungus grow from the fluid.

The fluid is also analyzed for the presence of white blood cells. In normal hip or knee fluid, there are a low number of white blood cells. The presence of a large number of white blood cells (particularly cells called neutrophils) indicates that the joint may be infected. The fluid may also be tested for specific proteins that are known to be present in the setting of an infection.

Treatment

Nonsurgical Treatment

In some cases, just the skin and soft tissues around the joint are infected, and the infection has not spread deep into the artificial joint itself. This is called a “superficial infection.” If the infection is caught early, your doctor may prescribe intravenous (IV) or oral antibiotics.

This treatment has a good success rate for early superficial infections.

Surgical Treatment

Infections that go beyond the superficial tissues and gain deep access to the artificial joint almost always require surgical treatment.

Debridement. Deep infections that are caught early (within several days of their onset), and those that occur within weeks of the original surgery, may sometimes be cured with a surgical washout of the joint. During this procedure, called debridement, the surgeon removes all contaminated soft tissues. The implant is thoroughly cleaned, and plastic liners or spacers are replaced. After the procedure, intravenous (IV) antibiotics will be prescribed for approximately 6 weeks.

Staged surgery. In general, the longer the infection has been present, the harder it is to cure without removing the implant.

Late infections (those that occur months to years after the joint replacement surgery) and those infections that have been present for longer periods of time almost always require a staged surgery.

The first stage of this treatment includes:

  • Removal of the implant
  • Washout of the joint and soft tissues
  • Placement of an antibiotic spacer
  • Intravenous (IV) antibiotics

An antibiotic spacer is a device placed into the joint to maintain normal joint space and alignment. It also provides patient comfort and mobility while the infection is being treated.

Knee Implant Compressors

(Top) These x-rays show an original knee replacement from the front and from the side. (Bottom) An antibiotic spacer has been placed in the joint during the first stage of treatment for joint replacement infection.

Spacers are made with bone cement that is loaded with antibiotics. The antibiotics flow into the joint and surrounding tissues and, over time, help to eliminate the infection.

Patients who undergo staged surgery typically need at least 6 weeks of IV antibiotics, or possibly more, before a new joint replacement can be implanted. Orthopaedic surgeons work closely with other doctors who specialize in infectious disease. These infectious disease doctors help determine which antibiotic(s) you will be on, whether they will be intravenous (IV) or oral, and the duration of therapy. They will also obtain periodic blood work to evaluate the effectiveness of the antibiotic treatment.

Once your orthopaedic surgeon and the infectious disease doctor determine that the infection has been cured (this usually takes at least 6 weeks), you will be a candidate for a new total hip or knee implant (called a revision surgery). This second procedure is stage 2 of treatment for joint replacement infection.

During revision surgery, your surgeon will remove the antibiotic spacer, repeat the washout of the joint, and implant new total knee or hip components.

An antibiotic spacer in a hip joint.

This x-ray shows knee components used in a revision surgery (stage 2). Note that the stems of the implants are longer to help support bone that has been compromised due to infection and removal of the previous implants.

Single-stage surgery. In this procedure, the implants are removed, the joint is washed out (debrided), and new implants are placed all in one stage.  Single-stage surgery is not as popular as two-stage surgery, but is gaining wider acceptance as a method for treating infected total joints. Doctors continue to study the outcomes of single-stage surgery.

Prevention

At the time of original joint replacement surgery, there are several measures taken to minimize the risk of infection. Some of the steps have been proven to lower the risk of infection, and some are thought to help but have not been scientifically proven. The most important known measures to lower the risk of infection after total joint replacement include:

  • Antibiotics before and after surgery. Antibiotics are given within one hour of the start of surgery (usually once in the operating room) and continued at intervals for 24 hours following the procedure.
  • Short operating time and minimal operating room traffic. Efficiency in the operation by your surgeon helps to lower the risk of infection by limiting the time the joint is exposed. Limiting the number of operating room personnel entering and leaving the room is thought to the decrease risk of infection.
  • Use of strict sterile technique and sterilization instruments. Care is taken to ensure the operating site is sterile, the instruments have been autoclaved (sterilized) and not exposed to any contamination, and the implants are packaged to ensure their sterility.
  • Preoperative nasal screening for bacterial colonization. There is some evidence that testing for the presence of bacteria (particularly the Staphylococcus species) in the nasal passages several weeks prior to surgery may help prevent joint infection. In institutions where this is performed, those patients that are found to have Staphylococcus in their nasal passages are given an intranasal antibacterial ointment prior to surgery. The type of bacteria that is found in the nasal passages may help your doctors determine which antibiotic you are given at the time of your surgery.
  • Preoperative chlorhexidine wash. There is also evidence that home washing with a chlorhexidine solution (often in the form of soaked cloths) in the days leading up to surgery may help prevent infection. This may be particularly important if patients are known to have certain types of antibiotic-resistant bacteria on their skin or in their nasal passages (see above). Your surgeon will talk with you about this option.
  • Long-term prophylaxis. Surgeons sometimes prescribe antibiotics for patients who have had joint replacements before they undergo dental work. This is done to protect the implants from bacteria that might enter the bloodstream during the dental procedure and cause infection. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons has developed recommendations for when antibiotics should be given before dental work and for which patients would benefit.  In general, most people do not require antibiotics before dental procedures. There is little evidence that taking antibiotics before dental procedures is effective at preventing infection.

    Antibiotics may also be considered before major surgical procedures; however, most patients do not require this. Your orthopaedic surgeon will talk with you about the risks and benefits of prophylactic antibiotics in your specific situation.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Knee Replacement Surgery for Arthritis

What Can I Do After Knee Replacement Surgery? When to Return to Normal Activity

Article Featured on AAOS

After having a knee replacement, you may expect your lifestyle to be a lot like it was before surgery— but without the pain. In many ways, you are right, but returning to your everyday activities takes time. Being an active participant in the healing process can help you get there sooner and ensure a more successful outcome.

Even though you will be able to resume most activities, you may want to avoid doing things that place excessive stress on your “new” knee, such as participating in high-impact sports like jogging. The suggestions here will help you enjoy your new knee while you safely resume your daily activities.

Hospital Discharge

Your hospital stay will typically last from 1 to 4 days, depending on the speed of your recovery. If your knee replacement is performed on an outpatient basis, you will go home on the same day as surgery.

Before you are discharged from the hospital, you will need to accomplish several goals, such as:

  • Getting in and out of bed by yourself.
  • Having acceptable pain control.
  • Being able to eat, drink, and use the bathroom.
  • Walking with an assistive device (a cane, walker, or crutches) on a level surface and being able to climb up and down two or three stairs.
  • Being able to perform the prescribed home exercises.
  • Understanding any knee precautions you may have been given to prevent injury and ensure proper healing.

If you are not able to accomplish these goals, it may be unsafe for you to go directly home after discharge. If this is the case, you may be temporarily transferred to a rehabilitation or skilled nursing center.

When you are discharged, your healthcare team will provide you with information to support your recovery at home. Although the complication rate after total knee replacement is low, when complications occur they can prolong or limit full recovery. Hospital staff will discuss possible complications, and review with you the warning signs of an infection or a blood clot.

Warning Signs of Infection

  • Persistent fever (higher than 100 degrees)
  • Shaking chills
  • Increasing redness, tenderness or swelling of your wound
  • Drainage of your wound
  • Increasing pain with both activity and rest

Warning Signs of a Blood Clot

  • Pain in your leg or calf unrelated to your incision
  • Tenderness or redness above or below your knee
  • Increasing swelling of your calf, ankle or foot

In very rare cases, a blood clot may travel to your lungs and become life-threatening. Signs that a blood clot has traveled to your lungs include:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Sudden onset of chest pain
  • Localized chest pain with coughing

Notify your doctor if you develop any of the above signs.

Recovery at Home

You will need some help at home for several days to several weeks after discharge. Before your surgery, arrange for a friend, family member or caregiver to provide help at home.

Preparing Your Home

The following tips can make your homecoming more comfortable, and can be addressed before your surgery:

  • Rearrange furniture so you can maneuver with a cane, walker, or crutches. You may temporarily change rooms (make the living room your bedroom, for example) to avoid using the stairs.
Home recovery center

Prepare a “recovery center” by placing items that you use frequently within easy reach.

  • Remove any throw rugs or area rugs that could cause you to slip. Securely fasten electrical cords around the perimeter of the room.
  • Get a good chair—one that is firm with a higher-than-average seat and has a footstool for intermittent leg elevation.
  • Install a shower chair, gripping bar, and raised toilet seat in the bathroom.
  • Use assistive devices such as a long-handled shoehorn, a long-handled sponge, and a grabbing tool or reacher to avoid bending over too far.

Wound Care

During your recovery at home, follow these guidelines to take care of your wound and prevent infection:

  • Keep the wound area clean and dry. A dressing will be applied in the hospital and should be changed as often as directed by your doctor. Ask for instructions on how to change the dressing before you leave the hospital.
  • Follow your doctor’s instructions on how long to wait before you shower or bathe.
  • Notify your doctor immediately if the wound appears red or begins to drain. This could be a sign of infection.

Swelling

You may have moderate to severe swelling in the first few days or weeks after surgery. You may have mild to moderate swelling for about 3 to 6 months after surgery. To reduce swelling, elevate your leg slightly and apply ice. Wearing compression stockings may also help reduce swelling. Notify your doctor if you experience new or severe swelling, since this may be the warning sign of a blood clot.

Medication

Take all medications as directed by your doctor. Home medications may include opioid and non-opioid pain pills, oral or injectable blood thinners, stool softeners, and anti-nausea medications.

Be sure to talk to your doctor about all your medications—even over-the-counter drugs, supplements and vitamins. Your doctor will tell you which over-the-counter medicines are safe to take while using prescription pain medication.

It is especially important to prevent any bacterial infections from developing in your artificial joint. Some patients with special circumstances may be required to take antibiotics prior to dental work to help prevent infection. Ask your doctor if you should take antibiotics before dental work. You may also wish to carry a medical alert card so that, if an emergency arises, medical personnel will know that you have an artificial joint.

Diet

By the time you go home from the hospital, you should be eating a normal diet. Your doctor may recommend that you take iron and vitamin supplements. You may also be advised to avoid supplements that include vitamin K and foods rich in vitamin K if you taking the blood thinner medication warfarin (Coumadin). Foods rich in vitamin K include broccoli, cauliflower, brussel sprouts, liver, green beans, garbanzo beans, lentils, soybeans, soybean oil, spinach, kale, lettuce, turnip greens, cabbage, and onions.

Continue to drink plenty of fluids and avoid alcohol. You should continue to watch your weight to avoid putting more stress on the joint.

Resuming Normal Activities

Once you get home, you should stay active. The key is to not do too much, too soon. While you can expect some good days and some bad days, you should notice a gradual improvement over time. Generally, the following guidelines will apply:

Driving

In most cases, it is safe to resume driving when you are no longer taking opioid pain medication, and when your strength and reflexes have returned to a more normal state. Your doctor will help you determine when it is safe to resume driving.

Sexual Activity

Please consult your doctor about how soon you can safely resume sexual activity. Depending on your condition, you may be able to resume sexual activity within several weeks after surgery.

Sleeping Positions

You can safely sleep on your back, on either side, or on your stomach.

Return to Work

Depending on the type of activities you do on the job and the speed of your recovery, it may take from several days to several weeks before you are able to return to work. Your doctor will advise you when it is safe to resume your normal work activities.

Sports and Exercise

Continue to do the exercises prescribed by your physical therapist for at least 2 months after surgery. In some cases, your doctor may recommend riding a stationary bicycle to help maintain muscle tone and keep your knee flexible. When riding, try to achieve the maximum degree of bending and straightening possible.

As soon as your doctor gives you the go-ahead, you can return to many of the sports activities you enjoyed before your knee replacement.

  • Walk as much as you would like, but remember that walking is no substitute for the exercises prescribed by your doctor and physical therapist.
  • Swimming is an excellent low-impact activity after a total knee replacement; you can begin swimming as soon as the wound is sufficiently healed. Your doctor will let you know when you can begin.
  • In general, lower impact fitness activities such as golfing, bicycling, and light tennis will help increase the longevity of your knee and are preferable over high-impact activities such as jogging, racquetball and skiing.

Air Travel

Pressure changes and immobility may cause your operated leg to swell, especially if it is just healing. Ask your doctor before you travel on an airplane. When going through security, be aware that the sensitivity of metal detectors varies and your artificial joint may cause an alarm. Tell the screener about your artificial joint before going through the metal detector.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

4 Tips For Senior Citizens Recovering From Knee Surgery

4 Tips For Senior Citizens Recovering From Knee Surgery

BY JOAN TIMPSON | Article Featured on Sunrise Care

As senior citizens age, their bodies become increasingly vulnerable to conditions that decrease mobility and cause chronic pain. One of the most commonly experienced diseases that impacts the joints and muscles of older adults is osteoarthritis, which affects approximately 8.75 million people, according to Arthritis Research UK. As a result of osteoarthritis and other forms of arthritis, many senior citizens turn to knee replacements for relief from pain and to regain mobility.

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Does Weight Loss Affect Knee Pain

Does Weight Loss Affect Knee Pain?

Why does my knee hurt?

Knee pain is one of the most common complications of being overweight or obese. If you’re among the millions of people who experience chronic knee pain, even a small weight loss can help reduce pain and lower the risk of osteoarthritis (OA).

According to a 2011 report from the Institute of Medicine (IOM), of the roughly 100 million American adults who experience common chronic pain, nearly 20 percent, or 20 million people, have knee pain. This is second only to the number of people with lower back pain.

More than two-thirds of people in the United StatesTrusted are either overweight (with a BMI between 25 and 29.9) or obese (with a BMI of 30 or higher).

Those extra pounds increase the stress on your knees. That stress can cause chronic pain and lead to other complications such as OA.

How weight loss affects knee pain

Maintaining a healthy weight has many health benefits, including reduced risk of a number of diseases that include:

  • heart disease
  • type 2 diabetes
  • high blood pressure
  • certain types of cancers

Losing weight benefits knee pain in two ways.

Decreases weight-bearing pressure on the knees

Each pound of weight loss can reduce the load on the knee joint by 4 pounds. Lose 10 pounds, and that’s 40 fewer pounds per step that your knees must support. And the results add up quickly. Less pressure means less wear and tear on the knees. This lowers the risk of OA.

Reduces inflammation in the body

For years, OA was considered a wear and tear disease caused by prolonged excess pressure on the joints, particularly the knees, which, in turn, caused inflammation. But recent research suggests that inflammation is a key OA risk factor, rather than a consequence of OA.

Being overweight may increase inflammation in the body that can lead to joint pain. Losing weight can reduce this inflammatory response. One study suggests that just a 10 percent reduction in weight can significantly lower inflammation in the body. Another study found that even simply overeating triggers the body’s immune response, which increases inflammation.

The link between weight gain and OA

Being overweight or obese significantly increases a person’s risk for developing OA. According to John Hopkins Medicine, women who are overweight are four times more likely to develop OA than women who are a healthy weight. And men who are overweight are five times more likely to develop OA than men who are a healthy weight.

But losing even a small amount of weight can be beneficial. For women who are overweight, every 11 pounds of weight loss can reduce the risk of knee OA by more than 50 percent. Men who drop into the overweight category (BMI below 30) and men who drop into the normal weight category (BMI below 26) can reduce their risk of knee OA by 21.5 percent.

Easy ways to lose weight

There are steps you can take to start shedding pounds, including:

  • reduce portion sizes
  • add one vegetable to your plate
  • go for a walk after a meal
  • take the stairs rather than the escalator or elevator
  • pack your own lunch instead of eating out
  • use a pedometer

Taking the necessary steps to manage your weight can help protect your knees from joint pain and reduce your risk of OA.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

What is Knee Arthroscopy? Benefits, Preparation, and Recovery

What is Knee Arthroscopy? Benefits, Preparation, and Recovery

By Jon Johnson | Featured on Medical News Today

Knee arthroscopy is a procedure that involves a surgeon investigating and correcting problems with a small tool called an arthroscope. It is a less invasive method of surgery used to both diagnose and treat issues in the joints. The arthroscope has a camera attached, and this allows doctors to inspect the joint for damage. The procedure requires very small cuts in the skin, which gives arthroscopy some advantages over more invasive surgeries.

Knee arthroscopy surgery has risen to popularity because it usually requires shorter recovery times. The procedure typically takes less than 1 hour, and serious complications are uncommon.

In this article, learn more about what to expect from knee arthroscopy.

Uses and benefits

Knee arthroscopy is less invasive than open forms of surgery. A surgeon can diagnose issues and operate using a very small tool, an arthroscope, which they pass through an incision in the skin.

Knee arthroscopy surgery may be helpful in diagnosing a range of problems, including:

  • persistent joint pain and stiffness
  • damaged cartilage
  • floating fragments of bone or cartilage
  • a buildup of fluid, which must be drained

In most of these cases, arthroscopy is all that is needed. People may choose it instead of other surgical procedures because arthroscopy often involves:

  • less tissue damage
  • a faster healing time
  • fewer stitches
  • less pain after the procedure
  • a lower risk of infection, because smaller incisions are made

However, arthroscopy may not be for everyone. There is little evidence that people with degenerative diseases or osteoarthritis can benefit from knee arthroscopy.

How to prepare

Many doctors will recommend a tailored preparation plan, which may include gentle exercises.

It is important for a person taking any prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medications to discuss them with the doctor. An individual may need to stop taking some medications ahead of the surgery. This may even include common OTC medications, such as ibuprofen (Advil).

A person may need to stop eating up to 12 hours before the procedure, especially if they will be general anesthesia. A doctor should provide plenty of information about what a person is allowed to eat or drink. Some doctors prescribe pain medication in advance. A person should fill this prescription before the surgery so that they will be prepared for recovery.

Procedure

The type of anesthetic used to numb pain will depend on the extent of the arthroscopy. A doctor may inject a local anesthetic to numb the affected knee only. If both knees are affected, the doctor may use a regional anesthetic to numb the person from the waist down.

In some cases, doctors will use a general anesthetic. In this case, the person will be completely asleep during the procedure. If the person is awake, they may be allowed to watch the procedure on a monitor. This is entirely optional, and some people may not be comfortable viewing this.

The procedure starts with a few small cuts in the knee. Surgeons use a pump to push saline solution into the area. This will expand the knee, making it easier for the doctors to see their work. After the knee is expanded, the surgeons insert the arthroscope. The attached camera allows the surgeons to explore the area and identify any problems. They may confirm earlier diagnoses, and they may take pictures.

If the problem can be fixed with arthroscopy, the surgeons will insert small tools through the arthroscope and use them to correct the issue. After the problem is fixed, the surgeons will remove the tools, use the pump to drain the saline from the knee, and stitch up the incisions. In many cases, the procedure takes less than 1 hour.

Walking, Not Riding, Boosts Health in Golfers With Knee Woes

Walking, Not Riding, Boosts Health in Golfers With Knee Woes

Walking the golf course instead of riding in a cart offers heart health benefits that may outweigh potential joint harm for golfers with knee osteoarthritis, a new small study reports. The study included 10 golfers with knee osteoarthritis who played two 18-hole rounds of golf. They walked the course in one round and used a golf cart in the other round.

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