albuquerque, new mexico, orthopaedic doctors

New Surgical Strategy Offers Hope for Repairing Spinal Injuries

Article Found on MedicalNewsToday

Surgery to reconnect sensory neurons to the spinal cord after a traumatic spinal injury works because offshoots from the spinal cord complete the spinal circuit.

Scientists in the UK and Sweden previously developed a new surgical technique to reconnect sensory neurons to the spinal cord after traumatic spinal injuries. Now, they have gained new insight into how the technique works at a cellular level by recreating it in rats with implications for designing new therapies for injuries where the spinal cord itself is severed. Read more

new mexico, orthopaedic doctors, albuquerque

How the Spinal Cord Works

Article Found on ChristopherReeve.org

What is the central nervous system?

The central nervous system (CNS) controls most functions of the body and mind. It consists of two parts: the brain and the spinal cord.

The brain is the center of our thoughts, the interpreter of our external environment, and the origin of control over body movement. Like a central computer, it interprets information from our eyes (sight), ears (sound), nose (smell), tongue (taste), and skin (touch), as well as from internal organs such as the stomach.

The spinal cord is the highway for communication between the body and the brain. When the spinal cord is injured, the exchange of information between the brain and other parts of the body is disrupted. Read more

Learn About Spinal Cord Injuries

Learn About Spinal Cord Injuries

Article Featured on Shepherd Center

Every year, about 12,000 people sustain a spinal cord injury. That’s 30 new injuries every day. Most of these people are injured in auto and sports-related accidents, falls and industrial mishaps. An estimated 60 percent of these individuals are 30 years old or younger, and the majority of them are men.

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Spinal Cord Injury

Spinal Cord Injury Symptoms

A spinal cord injury — damage to any part of the spinal cord or nerves at the end of the spinal canal — often causes permanent changes in strength, sensation and other body functions below the site of the injury.

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