11 Things Your Orthopedic Specialist Wants You to Know

Original Article By healthgrades.com

Insights from the Bone and Joint Experts

Whether you have ongoing backaches or sustain Read more

After Years of Paralysis, A Man Walks the Length of a Football Field

Original Article By Emily Willingham | Scientific Journal

An electrical stimulation device combined with intensive rehabilitation restores walking ability to a spinal cord injury patient

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What is joint replacement surgery?

Original Article: National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases


What is joint replacement surgery?

Joint replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased parts of a joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts.

Replacing a joint can reduce pain and help you move and feel better. Hips and knees are replaced most often. Other joints that can be replaced include the shoulders, fingers, ankles, and elbows.

Points To Remember About Joint Replacement Surgery

  • Joint replacement surgery removes damaged or diseased parts of a joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts.
  • The goals of joint replacement surgery are to relieve pain, help the joint work better, and improve walking and other movements.
  • Risks of problems after joint replacement surgery are much lower than they used to be.
  • An exercise program can reduce joint pain and stiffness.
  • Wearing away of the joint surface may become a problem after 15 to 20 years.

Why may joint replacement surgery be needed?

Joints may need to be replaced when they are damaged from:

  • Arthritis
  • Years of use
  • Disease

Your doctor will likely first suggest other treatments to reduce pain and help you move better, such as:

  • Walking aids, such as a cane or walker
  • An exercise program
  • Physical therapy
  • Medications

Sometimes the pain remains and makes daily activities hard to do. In this case, your doctor may order an x-ray to look at the joint. If the x-ray shows damage and your joint hurts, you may need a joint replacement.


What happens during joint replacement surgery?

During joint replacement your doctors will:

An illustration showing a hip prosthesis that is used in hip replacement surgery.
Hip Replacement Location
  • Give you medicine so you won’t feel pain. The medicine may block the pain only in one part of the body, or it may put your whole body to sleep.
  • Replace the damaged joint with a new man-made joint.
  • Move you to a recovery room until you are fully awake or the numbness goes away.


What can I expect after joint replacement surgery?

With knee or hip surgery, you will probably need to stay in the hospital for a few days. If you are elderly or have additional disabilities, you may then need to spend several weeks in an intermediate-care facility before going home. You and your team of doctors will determine how long you stay in the hospital.

After hip or knee replacement, you will often stand or begin walking the day of surgery. At first, you will walk with a walker or crutches. You may have some temporary pain in the new joint because your muscles are weak from not being used. Also, your body is healing. The pain can be helped with medicines and should end in a few weeks or months.

Physical therapy can begin the day after surgery to help strengthen the muscles around the new joint and help you regain motion in the joint. If you have your shoulder joint replaced, you can usually begin exercising the same day of your surgery! A physical therapist will help you with gentle, range-of-motion exercises. Before you leave the hospital, your therapist will show you how to use a pulley device to help bend and extend your arm.


What are the complications of joint replacement surgery?

Complications after joint replacement surgery are much lower than they used to be. When problems do occur, most are treatable. Problems could include:

  • Infection.
  • Blood clots.
  • Loosening of the joint.
  • Ball of the new joint comes out of its socket.
  • Wear on joint replacements.
  • Nerve and blood vessel injury.

New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

How Do Broken Bones Heal?

Original Article By Hallie Levine

Bones are flexible enough to give a bit when physical force is applied, but if that force is too great, they’ll snap like a plastic ruler bent too far. Luckily, they also repair themselves naturally. Here’s how it works.

Adults are held up by a skeleton composed of 206 bones that protect the body’s vital organs. Though it’s a sturdy frame, it’s vulnerable to problems—think issues like like osteoporosis and stress fractures, says Chad Deal, MD, director of the Center for Osteoporosis and Metabolic Health at the Cleveland Clinic.

Bones are flexible enough to give a bit when physical force is applied, but if that force is too great, they’ll snap like a plastic ruler bent too far. Luckily, they also repair themselves naturally (even better with a cast). Here’s how bones heal.

1. Immediately after a fracture occurs, a blood clot and callus form around it.

2. New “threads” of bone cells start to grow on both sides of the fracture line toward one another.

3. Eventually, the fracture closes up and the callus is absorbed by the new cells. This process may

take from six weeks to a year.

 


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

orthopaedic surgeons, new mexico

Improving Success of Hip & Knee Replacement Surgery

Article by Johnathon Cluett, MD | Found on VeryWell

Hip and knee replacement surgery are some of the most common orthopedic surgeries offered. Every year, hundreds of thousands of patients undergo hip replacement or knee replacement for treatment of severe arthritis of their joints. Surgical treatment of arthritis with a joint replacement is one of the most successful surgical interventions, but there are complications that can occur, and when complications do occur they can be very serious. Complications may include ongoing pain, wound healing problems, stiffness, infection, and other problems. Read more

albuquerque, new mexico, orthopaedic doctors

New Surgical Strategy Offers Hope for Repairing Spinal Injuries

Article Found on MedicalNewsToday

Surgery to reconnect sensory neurons to the spinal cord after a traumatic spinal injury works because offshoots from the spinal cord complete the spinal circuit.

Scientists in the UK and Sweden previously developed a new surgical technique to reconnect sensory neurons to the spinal cord after traumatic spinal injuries. Now, they have gained new insight into how the technique works at a cellular level by recreating it in rats with implications for designing new therapies for injuries where the spinal cord itself is severed. Read more

Knee Replacement Surgery for Arthritis

Knee Replacement Surgery for Arthritis

Article Featured on WebMD

Who Needs Knee Replacement Surgery?

You and your doctor may consider knee replacement surgery if you have a stiff, painful knee that makes it difficult to perform even the simplest of activities, and other treatments are no longer working. This surgery is generally reserved for people over age 50 who have severe osteoarthritis.

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Top 4 Most Common Orthopedic Surgeries

Top 4 Most Common Orthopedic Surgeries

Orthopedic surgery has to do with conditions that involve the muscles and skeletons in the human body, even though orthopedic surgeons may use nonsurgical approaches to solve orthopedic problems as well.

Though every surgeon will see a variety of different patient cases that require different treatments, there are a few orthopedic procedures that tend to be the most common. Here are the top 4 most common orthopedic surgeries:

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Sports-Related Wrist and Hand Injuries: A Review

Sports-Related Wrist and Hand Injuries: A Review

Approximately 25 % of all sports-related injuries involve the hand or wrist [1, 2], and incidence is growing not only due to the competitive level of high school and collegiate athletes but also due to the activity level of the general population [3]. While the shoulder and knee are the commonly thought of in athletic injury, hand and wrist injuries are common and can have a significant impact especially if initially disregarded with a resultant delay to treatment.

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