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Is Your Child Ready for Sports?

Article Found on HealthyChildren.org

Sports readiness means that a child has the physical, mental, and social skills to meet the demands of the sport. While general guidelines can help you select a sport based on age, it’s important to remember that children develop at different rates. Children are more likely to enjoy and succeed in sports when they have the physical, mental, and social skills required by the sport.

Ages 2 to 5 years

Before age 6 years, most children do not have the basic motor skills for organized sports. Balance and attention span are limited, and vision and ability to track moving objects are not fully mature. Instead, look for other sports activities that focus on basic skills such as runningswimmingtumbling, throwing, and catching. These skills can be improved through active play but do not require organized sports activities. Children at this age have a short attention span and learn best when they can explore, experiment, and copy others. Instruction should be limited, follow a show-and-tell format, and include playtime. Competition should be avoided. Parents can be good role models and should be encouraged to participate.

Ages 6 to 9 years

By age 6 years, most children have the basic motor skills for simple organized sports. However, they may still lack the hand-eye coordination needed to perform complex motor skills and may not yet be ready to understand and remember concepts like teamwork and strategies. Sports that can be adapted to be played at a basic level and focus on basic motor skills are the most appropriate. This includes running, swimming, soccerbaseballtennisgymnasticsmartial arts, and skiing. Sports that require complex visual and motor skills, quick decision-making, or detailed strategies or teamwork (footballbasketballhockeyvolleyball) will be difficult unless modified for younger players. Rules should be flexible to promote success, action, and participation. The sport should focus on learning new skills rather than winning. The equipment and rules should also be appropriate for young children. For example, smaller balls, smaller fields, shorter game times and practices, fewer children playing at the same time, frequent changing of positions, and less focus on score keeping.

Ages 10 to 12 years

By ages 10 to 12 years, most children are ready for more complex sports. They have the motor skills and cognitive ability to play sports that require complex motor skills, teamwork, and strategies. Most experts believe that sports at this level should focus on skill development, fun, and participation, not competition. Most children would rather play more on a losing team than less on a winning team.

Some children in this age group may be starting puberty. During this time, the physical differences between children, particularly boys of the same age, can be dramatic. This can make a difference in what sport is best for your child. Boys who start puberty sooner will be temporarily taller, heavier, and stronger. This may give them a physical advantage, but it doesn’t mean they are more talented and will continue to excel in sports. If possible, they should compete with boys with the same physical ability. Similarly, boys who mature later may experience a temporary physical disadvantage in sports. This should not be seen as a lack of talent or ability. These boys should be encouraged to play sports with less emphasis on physical size, such as racquet sports, swimming, martial arts, wrestling, and certain track events.

Also, growth spurts can temporarily affect coordination, balance, and the ability to perform a skill. Keep in mind that it can be frustrating if this is seen as a lack of talent or effort.

Other Guidelines

  • Get fit and learn a new skill. Encourage your children to participate in activities that promote physical fitness as well as learning sports skills. The activities should be fun and right for their ages.
  • Focus on fun. Choose sports programs that focus on personal involvement, variety, success, and fun rather than competition, strict rules, and winning. It may help them stay interested and want to keep playing.
  • Check out the rules. Equipment and rules should be right for their ages. If not, they should be modified.
  • Make sure safety is a priority. Appropriate setting, equipment, protective gear, program design, and rules of play are important.
  • Keep differences in mind. Prior to puberty, there are very few differences between boys and girls in endurance, strength, height, or body mass, and they can compete together on an equal basis. During puberty, to make sure athletes are well matched in contact sports, consideration should be given to body size and physical maturity as well as chronological age.
  • Proceed with caution. Early specialization in a single sport, intensive training, and year-round training should be undertaken with caution because of the risk of overuse injury, mental stress, and burnout. Playing only one sport may also prevent a child from developing a variety of motor skills that they would learn from participating in several different sports.
  • Wait until your children are ready. Children should not play competitive win/lose sports until they understand that their self-worth is not based on the outcome of the game.
  • Find a good sports program. Get feedback from other children and parents who are in the programs. Try to check out programs before you join them. A sign of a good program is children having fun.

New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area. New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more. If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

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3 Ways to Make Healthy Habits Stick

Article by Stacy Peterson | Found on MayoClinic.org

How many times have you set lofty weight-loss goals at the start of a new year and given up on them just a few weeks later? Or maybe you vowed to kick poor eating habits once and for all but slipped back into your old ways soon after. Resolutions offer a lot of promise, but they tend to fizzle out when a challenge arises or motivation wanes. So what exactly makes lasting change so hard?

The simple answer is that we are creatures of habit. It takes energy and intention for our brains to pause and think about doing things differently. Consider the behaviors and skills that are so ingrained in you now as an adult, such as brushing your teeth or driving a car. When you first started doing them, you had to really think about how to do them.

Want to start making steps toward real change? Try these simple tips to make new habits stick.

  1. Ditch the all-or-nothing approach. Grand ambitions may be motivating in the beginning, but trying to change too much at once is likely to lead to disappointment. Instead, start small. For example: If you want to clean up your eating habits, begin by making consistent healthier choices at one meal and build from there. Discover your favorite healthy breakfast foods — oatmeal, eggs, smoothies, Greek yogurt, fruit — and make sure you have them readily available.
  2. Look for opportunities to make changes. Would you like to be more active? Before you sign up for a 5K, try walking an extra five to 10 minutes a few times a day. Opt to take the stairs when you can. And go for a quick walk when you catch yourself sitting for too long.
  3. Be patient. Track your positive changes with a food or activity journal so that you can reflect on them. Remember that it may take time to see results, and that’s ok. If weight loss is your overall goal, focus on the behaviors that help you get there rather than the scale alone. It’s important to celebrate your day-to-day accomplishments, no matter how big or small. Over time you’ll reap the rewards of a healthier lifestyle.

Although change is difficult, pathways for different ways of thinking and behaving can be created and strengthened with intention, time and effort. With repetition, these new habits get easier and become the norm. So stick with them!

Experiments

  1. Try incorporating your new behavior into something you’re already doing. For example: If you want to add movement to your day, walk around the block before you bring in the mail. If you’d like to make gratitude a priority, the next time you’re in the shower reflect on people or events in your life that you appreciate.
  2. Determine what your small change is this week, and stick to it. For example: Add one vegetable to your meals each day. Or set aside time at the beginning of each week to create a meal plan and grocery list.
  3. Reach out to a family member, friend or colleague who might be able to support you in the change you’re looking to make. If you have a friend who is a motivating workout buddy or a great encourager, enlist his or her help — you don’t have to do it alone!

New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions ó such as sports injuries and fractures ó to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

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What is Tendinosis?

Article by Amy Smith | Found on MedicalNewsToday

Tendinosis is a chronic tendon injury. It is a common condition but is often misdiagnosed as tendinitis.

In this article, learn about the symptoms, causes, and treatments for tendinosis, as well as what makes it different from tendinitis. Read more

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Study Proves ‘Muscle Memory’ Exists at a DNA Level

Article Found on ScienceDaily

A study led by researchers at Keele University has shown for the first time that human muscles possess a ‘memory’ of earlier growth — at the DNA level.

Periods of skeletal muscle growth are ‘remembered’ by the genes in the muscle, helping them to grow larger later in life. Read more

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Studies reveal characteristics of bone, tendon injuries incurred by Olympic athletes

Article Found on ScienceDaily

Female athletes participating in the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro were more likely to experience bone stress injuries in their lower extremities while competing in track and field compared to other events. In addition, tendon abnormalities similarly were most common in track and field athletes, however they most frequently involved the shoulder, Achilles and patellar tendons.

These findings, which are published in two separate studies in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, are the first to report epidemiological data on bone stress injuries and tendon abnormalities detected at the Olympic Games. They were conducted in collaboration with researchers from New York, Pennsylvania, Switzerland, Norway, France, Germany and Brazil. Read more

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How an MRI Machine Works for Orthopedics

Article by Jonathan Cluett | Found on VeryWell

MRI stands for magnetic resonance imaging. In actuality, the proper name for this study is a nuclear magnetic resonance image (NMRI), but when the technique was being developed for use in health care the connotation of the word “nuclear” was felt to be too negative and was left out of the accepted name.

MRI is based on the physical and chemical principles of nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR), a technique used to gain information about the nature of molecules. Read more

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What Is a Frozen Shoulder?

Article Found on WebMD

Frozen shoulder is a condition that affects your shoulder joint. It usually involves pain and stiffness that develops gradually, gets worse and then finally goes away. This can take anywhere from a year to 3 years.

Your shoulder is made up of three bones that form a ball-and-socket joint. They are your upper arm (humerus), shoulder blade (scapula), and collarbone (clavicle). There’s also tissue surrounding your shoulder joint that holds everything together. This is called the shoulder capsule. Read more

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3 Common Shoulder Sports Injuries

Article by Amy Haddad | Found on Sports-Health.com

The shoulder is the most mobile joint in the body, which also makes it prone to injury. If you’re an athlete, taxing your shoulder over time with repetitive, overhead movements or participating in contact sports may put your shoulder at risk for injury.

These are three common shoulder injuries caused by sports participation:

1. SLAP tear

This is a tear to the ring of cartilage (labrum) that surrounds your shoulder’s socket. A SLAP tear tends to develop over time from repetitive, overhead motions, such as throwing a baseball, playing tennis or volleyball, or swimming.

See SLAP Tear Shoulder Injury and Treatment

You may notice these telltale symptoms:

  • Athletic performance decreases. You have less power in your shoulder, and your shoulder feels like it could “pop out.”
  • Certain movements cause pain. You notice that pain occurs with certain movements, like throwing a baseball or lifting an object overhead.
  • Range of motion decreases. You may not throw or lift an object overhead like you used to, as your range of motion decreases. You may also find reaching movements difficult.
  • Shoulder pain you can’t pinpoint. You have deep, achy pain in your shoulder, but you can’t pinpoint the exact location.

If you have a SLAP tear, you may also notice a clicking, grinding, locking, or popping sensation in your shoulder.

2. Shoulder instability

It’s common to experience shoulder instability if you’re an athlete. This injury can occur if you’re participating in contact sports, including football or hockey, or ones that require repetitive movements, like baseball.

Shoulder instability happens when your ligaments, muscles, and tendons no longer secure your shoulder joint. As a result, the round, top part of your upper arm bone (humeral head) dislocates (the bone pops out of the shoulder socket completely), or subluxates (the bone partially comes out of the socket).

Dislocation is characterized by severe, sudden onset of pain; subluxation (partial dislocation) may be accompanied by short bursts of pain. Other symptoms include arm weakness and lack of movement. Swelling and bruising on your arm are visible changes you may also notice.

3. Rotator cuff injury

This is another injury commonly seen in athletes participating in repetitive, overhead sports, including swimming and tennis. Rotator cuff injuries are typically characterized by weakness in the shoulder, reduced range of motion, and stiffness.

See Rotator Cuff Injuries

Rotator cuff injuries are also painful. Here’s what you need to know:

  • Pain at night is common; you may not be able to sleep comfortably on the side of your injured shoulder.
  • Pain may be experienced with certain movements, especially overhead movements.
  • Pain in your shoulder or arm may also occur.

Similar to a SLAP tear, people with rotator cuff injuries often experience achy shoulder pain.

Being aware of these injuries and knowing their symptoms may encourage you to seek medical treatment sooner; early treatment intervention could result in a better outcome and earlier return to sports.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

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How Do Broken Bones Heal?

Article By Yella Hewings-Martin, PhD | Found on MedicalNewsToday

A fall, followed by a crack – many people are no stranger to this. Broken bones are painful, but the majority heal very well. The secret lies in stem cells and bone’s natural ability to renew itself.

Many people think of bones as being solid, rigid, and structural. Bone is, of course, key to keeping our bodies upright, but it is also a highly dynamic and active organ.

Old bone is constantly being replaced by new bone in a finely tuned interplay of the cells present. This mechanism of daily maintenance comes in handy when we are faced with a broken bone.

It allows stem cells to first produce cartilage and then create new bone to heal the break, all of which is facilitated by a finely tuned sequence of events. Read more

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Throwing It Away- Pitching Injuries Are On The Rise

Article by Jason Zaremski | Found on Sports.good.is

Baseball marks the end of winter and the start of spring, and as a nation, we not only delight in watching the pros, but also in watching our kids play this great game.

Unfortunately, we sports medicine doctors are seeing an increase in injuries to the throwing arm in youngsters, and many of these require surgery. Most worrisome is that the risk for developing a throwing injury was shown to increase by 36 times in adolescent pitchers who continued playing with a fatigued arm. Read more