5 Best Low Impact Cardio Exercises for People with Bad Knees

5 Best Low Impact Cardio Exercises for People with Bad Knees

Article By Francesca Menato | Featured on Women’s Health

Anyone with a knee injury, new or old, will know how easy it is to feel it flair up with extreme cardio. Running, in particular, is very tough on the knees – so what exercises can you do to get the heart rate up, without hurting already bad knees?

We caught up with Lorraine Furmedge, Fitness First PT Ambassador, to find out the best workouts and exercises for bad knees.

Before you lace up your running shoes and risk another niggle, try these.

1. Swimming

If you’re on the search for cardio exercises for bad knees, head to the pool. Swimming provides a great workout that is low impact, versatile and burns calories fast. Whether you’re doing the butterfly or backstroke you’ll work all major muscle groups in your body including your glutes, abdominals and chest muscles.

Wondering which is the best stroke?

Freestyle, which tends to be the fastest stroke, can burn 100 calories every 10 minutes – more than jogging – but all of them will work your whole body.

2. Elliptical

Opt for an elliptical over a treadmill for minimal risk of knee injury. Your feet never leave the pedals, which means there is less of a chance to injure your knees, back, neck or hips. You’ll also get your heart rate up, making you work up a sweat! Increase the resistant to really test your endurance.

There’s a lot of discussion around which cardio machines burn more calories, and generally, the treadmill does tend to come out on top given you are moving whilst also supporting the full weight of your body but elliptical trainers are fantastic for getting in a great cardio workout with a bit more support.

With any form of exercise, you get out what you put in so it all depends on how hard you push and challenge yourself.

3. Stationary rowing

Rowing is a great way to burn calories without placing stress on your knee joints. Not only will you get a total body workout, you’ll also maximise your core strength with every pull.

Amp up the intensity by increasing the resistance while maintaining speed for a real cardiovascular challenge.

The more you train on a certain machine, the more stamina and strength your body will gain in that particular area, meaning the harder you have to work each time to continue challenging yourself.

If calorie burning is your main aim, switch up your routine and use a mixture of machines and freestyle training – it will keep your body guessing and will test you in different ways.

4. Cycling

Whether you prefer hitting a stationary bike indoors or riding your bicycle outside, you’ll get a fantastic fat-burning workout that will gradually improve your knee flexibility and strength.

To ensure you don’t put pressure on your knees, avoid hills and stick to a flat terrain. Raise your seat level slightly to decrease any pressure on your kneecap.

Wondering what resistance you should use? When it comes to cycling with resistance, there is no right or wrong answer.

Low resistance is great for those people who are just getting into fitness as it allows you to start building up your stamina without over-exerting yourself. Likewise, those suffering with knee injuries may find this an effective and low impact way of getting their regular exercise sessions in without causing further damage.

Medium and high resistance is more suited to those with higher fitness levels and works really well when it comes to building strength in your legs and lower body. If you’ve recently recovered from a knee injury consider using resistance to increase your strength and safeguard against any further damage.

To combine cardio and strength try some interval training and switch between low resistance sprints and medium-high resistance climbs.

Wondering about spin classes? Don’t fret. All good spin instructors will check for injuries before the class begins so let them know and they’ll be able to advise on how to best tackle the session.

Plus, the beauty of spin is that you can carry out the class at your own pace. Remember, you are in control and can adjust your pace according to your ability.

5. Step ups

For a low-impact cardio workout, turn to an aerobic step bench.

Step up onto the step with your right foot. Tap your left foot on the top of the step and then lower.

As you step up, your knee should be directly over your ankle to ensure you’re protecting your knees.

Repeat 10 times for a great calorie burn.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

Allergy Safe Halloween

Teal Pumpkins Mark Allergy Safe Halloween Stops

By Jennifer Clopton | Article Featured on WebMD

Last year was the first year that Mia was old enough to really celebrate Halloween, and the little girl was so excited about it. The 2-year-old dressed up as Poppy from the movie Trolls — in a blue satin dress and a large multicolored headband, complete with a shock of pink hair — and headed out with her parents and brother to go trick-or-treating.

But the night took a terrifying turn for the Illinois family once they got home and learned the hard way just how quickly and easily allergic reactions can happen on Halloween.

Read more

What to Expect After Knee Surgery

What to Expect After Knee Surgery

After your surgery, there are a variety of things you need to know for your safety, recovery and comfort. You will receive instructions on your nutrition, medicines, exercise program, activity level, discharge equipment, follow-up appointment, and signs and symptoms to watch for.

Within this section is what to expect during your recovery, what your incision should look like after total knee replacement, a list of commonly asked questions, a list of questions to ask at your follow-up appointment, and information about pain relief, pain medicines, anti-inflammatory medicines, constipation and nutrition.

Ask your health care team if you have any questions. They want your recovery to be as smooth as possible.

What to expect during your recovery

After surgery, it may take a while before you feel like your normal self. Recovery is different for each person. The following are a few things that you may have after surgery and some ways to manage these feelings.

  • You may have discomfort for a couple weeks to one year after your surgery. To help manage discomfort or pain after your surgery:
    • take your pain medicine as instructed by your surgeon
    • rest between activities as needed
    • lie down, raise (elevate) your surgical leg and put cold packs around your surgical knee at least three times a day; see the home exercise program page for more instructions.
  • You may have trouble sleeping. To sleep better after surgery:
    • try not to sleep or nap too much during the day
    • try to create a routine of going to bed and waking up at the same time each day
    • try not to drink too many liquids right before going to bed
  • Your energy level will be low for at least the first month after surgery. To help manage your energy level after surgery:
    • try to take your pain medicine at the same time each day
    • rest between activities
    • try to get up and move around each hour you are awake
  • You may not have much of an appetite.
    • Your desire for food will slowly return.
    • Be sure to drink plenty of liquids to stay hydrated. Try to drink six to eight 8-ounce glasses of liquids each day.
  • You may have constipation. This can be caused by taking pain medicine. Learn more about how to manage constipation after surgery.

New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

orthopaedic doctors, new mexico

Healthy Aging: Preserving Your Bones and Joints

Whether you’re a young adult, baby boomer or senior, here’s what you can do now.

Article Featured on US News

PAUL SCHNEIDER, 90, OF Palm Harbor, Florida, starts his morning exercise with 100 situps. A couple golf matches a week, plus weight and aerobic workouts at his fitness club, also keep him flexible and strong.

Schneider stays slender and watches what he eats. He drinks water, not soda. He takes Tums for calcium, as well as fish oil and vitamin D supplements. He was never sedentary, either as a sales manager in the emerging computer industry or as a father of four. “I have fortunately – knock on wood – never broken a bone,” he says.

As aging conspires to chip away at your bone and joint health, experts explain what you can do to maintain these through every phase of life:

Start Early

Bone and joint health begin in childhood, says Dr. Sundeep Khosla, director of the Aging Bone, Muscle and Joint Program within the Mayo Clinic’s Kogod Center on Aging.

“Physical activity is important for loading the bones and helping them develop as strong as they can,” Khosla says. Parents can watch that kids don’t replace milk with sodas, thereby missing out on calcium. And it’s never too soon to discourage smoking, which can affect bone mass.

The adolescent growth spurt brings a marked rise in fractures, Khosla says. It’s believed when the skeleton is rapidly growing, an increased need for calcium may cause thinning, especially in delicate wrist bones. “So when these kids fall, they get wrist fractures,” he says.

If these fractures occur with mild injuries, like falling from a low height, that’s a sign kids have skeletal defects tied to low bone mass, Khosla says. “And that low bone mass tracks into young adulthood.”

Pillars of Bone Health

When it comes to healthy aging, Paul Schneider has an expert in his corner. His daughter, Dr. Diane Schneider,​ is a geriatrician, osteoporosis expert and author of “The Complete Book of Bone Health.”

Calcium, vitamin D, diet and exercise are the cornerstones of bone health, she says. Staying at a healthy weight is important: “You don’t want to be carrying around extra weight because that’s what’s going to start wearing out your hips and knees.”

What’s good for the bones isn’t necessarily good for the joints. “For your skeleton, you want weight-bearing exercises,” Schneider says. “But for your joints, weight-bearing exercises may also contribute to wearing them out.” She advises moderation and variety: If you’re a dedicated runner, for instance, work out with weights at the gym for a change.

Young Adult Challenges

“Your late 20s, early 30s is when you achieve what is called peak bone mass,” Schneider says. But college and career demands can disrupt health and exercise regimens, even for people who were active as teens.

Diet also changes for young adults, like drinking less milk. Schneider advises limiting caffeinated beverages – soda and coffee – particularly if your calcium intake is low. She recommends water instead. Alcohol consumption can affect bone health. “Moderate drinking, which would be one or two alcoholic beverages, is OK,” Schneider says. “More than that is too much.”

If you can’t cover the recommended calcium intake for your age group, Schneider says, either do a “menu makeover” to put calcium-rich food in your diet, or use a calcium supplement.

“Try to limit meals on the go,” she says. “They tend to be higher in sodium and carbohydrates and scant on vegetables.” And like alcohol, they can lead to putting on pounds.

Staying active isn’t always easy. “Try to schedule your exercise time and spend more time on your feet,” Schneider says. In the workplace, innovations like standing desks let employees sit less.

Maintain Bone Mass in Midlife

Middle age is a critical period for bone and joint health. After 50, calcium requirements for post-menopausal women rise from 1,000 to 1,200 milligrams,​ Schneider notes – but calorie requirements don’t. As metabolism slows, weight can creep up. “So women may need more time to maintain their fitness,” Schneider says.

Making time to exercise isn’t easy for the sandwich generation. Try working fitness into your day: strapping on a pedometer for 10,000 steps, parking farther from your building, taking the stairs instead of the elevator.

Exercises to strengthen muscles also help protect the joints they support, Schneider says, which is important when arthritis shows up in middle age.

“With women, of course, the menopausal transition is when you really start accelerating bone loss because of the hormonal level fluctuations,” she says. Men also experience hormonal changes, with both testosterone and estrogen, but their bone loss is more gradual and less marked, Schneider says.

Avoiding osteoporosis  the silent condition that eats away at bones, leaving them thin, weak and vulnerable to breaks – is paramount. The National Osteoporosis Foundation offers guidelines for when people should undergo a bone-density test (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry or DEXA scan) based on their age, gender and risk factors – such as family history, smoking and certain medications.

Senior Strong

Faye Strum, 75, a retired teacher in La Jolla, California, hasn’t let osteoporosis disrupt her active life. About 18 years ago, she learned she had the condition after undergoing a bone scan during a routine checkup. Until then, Strum had no idea her bones were at risk. “I am of small stature,” she says. With the diagnosis, “I didn’t want to lose any height. And I’ve always been active, so I wanted to keep my muscles strong.”

Strum has taken bone-building medications and safeguards her bones while staying active. “I do more specialized exercise. I take in plenty of calcium. And I’m careful in how much I do in terms of lifting,” she says. “I don’t pick up little grandchildren and hold them up high.” She continues to walk and play tennis, and attends a healthy-bone class twice a week at a nearby sport-and-health center, where she works out with weights and bands and does balance exercise. And she attends a weekly gentle-yoga class.

Balance and core-strength exercise such as yoga and Tai Chi reduce your risk of falls and resulting fractures, Schneider says.

Improve Your ‘Health Span’

It’s never too late to optimize your bone health, Khosla says. “There are now drugs – and more drugs on the horizon – that can build your bone back up,” he says. “So you can at least partially reverse the bone loss.”

His group is working to better understand the underlying causes of bone aging and pinpoint people at higher risk of fractures. While DEXA is an “excellent” diagnostic tool, he says, upcoming imaging tools can provide detailed information on bone structure. And researchers are working on new tests to determine the quality of a patient’s bone.

“While extending lifespan is important, it doesn’t really help if that lifespan you extend is full of disability and pain,” Khosla says. In the aging-research community, the newer concept is extending “health span,” he says. “So you may not necessarily extend the actual life from 95 or 100 or whatever. But within that time frame, you’ll have more years of the better quality of life and healthier life.”


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

What Does It Feel Like When You Have a Blood Clot?

What Does It Feel Like When You Have a Blood Clot?

Article Featured on Healthline

Overview

Blood clots are a serious issue, as they can be life-threatening. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), an estimated 900,000 people in the United States are affected by this condition each year. The CDC further estimates that 60,000 to 100,000 people die from this condition annually.

When a blood clot occurs in one of your veins, it’s called a venous thromboembolism (VTE). If you’re even slightly concerned you might have one, call your doctor right away. Symptoms of blood clots can vary. It’s also possible to have a blood clot with no symptoms.

Read on to learn about some of the symptoms that may indicate a blood clot.

 

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11 Things Your Orthopedic Specialist Wants You to Know

Original Article By healthgrades.com

Insights from the Bone and Joint Experts

Whether you have ongoing backaches or sustain Read more

FALL PREVENTION FOR OLDER ADULTS

Original Article By healthcare.utah.edu

Falls are a serious problem for the elderly. According to the Centers for Disease Control more than one out of every four people over the age of 65 suffers a fall each year. University of Utah Health’s Trauma Program treats hundreds of falls involving elderly patients each year — with nearly half of those patients between the ages of 65-84.

Those falls can result in numerous orthopedic injuries, as well as the potential for skin damage and even a more serious head injury. They also increase the likelihood that the person will fall again. Yet, despite the serious implications of falling, most patients do not tell their doctors when it happens.

This begs the question: What can be done to prevent someone from sustaining a fall while at their home?  The National Council on Aging (NCOA) has some tips that could help you from sustaining a fall in your residence:

  • Find a good balance and exercise program
  • Talk to your health care provider
  • Regularly review your medications with your doctor or pharmacist
  • Get your vision and hearing checked annually and update your eyeglasses
  • Keep your home safe
  • Talk to your family members

When you are looking for an exercise program, find one that will build balance, strength, and flexibility. In Utah, programs such as “Stepping On” and “Tai Chi for Arthritis” are available all across the state. Talking to your doctor about your current health and having them perform a fall assessment could also help prevent a fall.

While visiting with your doctor, ask them to review your medications for unwanted side effects that may cause you to fall. In addition to speaking with your primary care physician, talk to your eye doctor annually about your vision. Update your eye glasses prescription at a minimum of every year. Look for tripping hazards such as rugs or loose carpet, and have them removed. Have family members help update your lighting in poorly lit areas, and install grab bars near stairs. Finally, have your family help as much as possible. Falls can impact families, so ask them for support to make your life falls free.

For additional resources, please contact your primary care provider and tell them you are worried about falling. You can also contact the Faint and Falls Clinic at University of Utah Health, our Trauma Program (www.healthcare.utah.edu/trauma), or the National Council on Aging (www.ncoa.org). Local senior centers have great resources (and workout classes also!) that you could use to help keep yourself free from falls.


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.

MRI sees the lesions that flag future knee pain

Original Article By Futurity.com

Factors that indicated study participants were at higher risk included frequent knee bending activity and Read more

Bone Scans and Bone Health Screenings

Original Article By WebMD

A bone density scan can detect thinning bones at an early stage. If you already have osteoporosis, bone scans can also tell you how fast the disease is progressing.But an abnormal bone scan can create as many questions as it answers. Who should get a bone density scan, and what do the results mean? If your bone density is below normal, what can you expect, and what should you do?

A Date With DEXA

Most bone scans use a technology called DEXA (for dual energy X-ray absorptiometry). In a DEXA scan, a person lies on a table while a technician aims a scanner mounted on a long arm. (Think of the machine that X-rays your teeth at the dentist; the difference is that this test uses very low energy radiation.)

“DEXA currently is the easiest, most standardized form of bone density testing, so that’s what we use,” says Mary Rhee, MD, MS, an endocrinologist and assistant professor of medicine at Emory University in Atlanta.

The DEXA scanner uses beams of very low-energy radiation to determine the density of the bone. The amount of radiation is tiny: about one-tenth of a chest X-ray. The test is painless, and considered completely safe. Pregnant women should not get DEXA scans because the developing baby shouldn’t be exposed to radiation, no matter how low the dose, if possible.

Measurements are usually taken at the hip, and sometimes the spine and other sites. Insurance or Medicare generally pays for the test in women considered at risk for osteoporosis, or those already diagnosed with osteoporosis or osteopenia.

Other less commonly used technologies can measure bone density. They include:

  • Variations of DEXA, which measure bone density in the forearm, finger, or heel.
  • Quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Essentially a CAT scan of the bones, QCT provides more detailed images than DEXA.
  • Ultrasound of the bones in the heel, leg, kneecap, or other areas.

While all of these can determine bone density and osteoporosis risk, “DEXA is the most important test and is the gold standard,” says Felicia Cosman, MD, clinical director for the National Osteoporosis Foundation.

Read more

NUTRITION TO AID INJURY RECOVERY

Original Article By Carolyne Whelan

As a culture, we Americans tend to put a lot of focus on the external healing of a wound or injury. We bandage, splint, cast. Eventually, maybe, we venture into the realm of physical therapy and/or yoga. But our beautiful, complex bodies are doing so much work on the inside to heal what’s broken that it’s worth taking a look at how that’s done and what we can do to help ourselves help our cells.

First and foremost, keeping up with electrolytes is very important. Humans are living, breathing, electrically charged beings. All of life is, really. And the ions that, when dissolved in water, create that electric charge are called electrolytes. They are what keep us alive and what keep us working properly. This is a very simplistic description, of course, but electrolyte balance is crucial for healing so that your cells can do their wonderful things. There are 7 main electrolytes: sodium, chloride, potassium, magnesium, calcium, phosphate, and bicarbonate, and we need to keep these all in balance. Remember, these are ions that are electrically charged in water, so be sure to be also drinking a ton of water in general and especially while recovering from an injury.

Second, even though you may be hanging out in bed binge-watching Absolutely Fabulous on Netflix while you wait for your new limb to grow, you still need to eat (and, realistically, even if you have a broken bone, your body will heal faster if you are energizing it with activity and moving around however you’re able). While you might be relaxing, your body is working long hours of overtime trying to regenerate what you broke, so make sure it has the fuel it needs to get that done. Plan to eat about 15-20 calories per pound of body weight (if you weigh 150 lbs., you should be consuming close to 3,000 calories a day). But don’t just eat a sleeve of cookies and call it a day; broken bones need vitamins and minerals! And protein! And antioxidant anti-inflammatory nutrients! You might as well double down on your calories and make them count.

Vitamins E and C and omega-3 fatty acids will help fight free radicals that break down bone collagen and cause inflammation, meanwhile Copper helps the formation of bone collagen, so consuming all of these at once is a double whammy for any fracture trying hard to heal. Zinc enhances bone protein production and therefore stimulates fracture healing. Calcium and Phosphorus are the main minerals in bones and regulate the strength and elastic stiffness of bones. In the first stages of healing, your broken bone will leech from your other bones to heal itself as efficiently as possible, so it’s important to make sure you are consuming lots of vitamins so that you can replenish your body and keep your fracture fed with the nutrients it needs to heal. Other vitamins that are essential for healing and recovery are D and K, which help you retain calcium, and B6 which is a general fracture-reducing vitamin that helps fractures heal faster and also keeps them from happening in the first place.

Now that you know the micros of what you need to eat, what foods will give you these nutrients? Multivitamins are great and all, but unless it is a whole foods vitamin and those foods are in your diet naturally, your body will not absorb the vitamin (that’s why your pee is weird when you take a vitamin). Protein powders are packed with nutrition, but who wants to drink 5 protein shakes a day (I’ve been there, it’s not great). Quinoa is often called a superfood, but that doesn’t mean a whole lot if you’re just in the grocery store wondering why you should pay extra for a simple grain. What makes it “super” is that quinoa’s a grain that provides complex carbohydrates and calories, it’s a complete protein, and it’s also a good source of magnesium. Kale, another “superfood,” is a fantastic source of vitamins A, C and K as well as omega 3 fatty acids; meanwhile spinach will provide you with a ton of Iron. Broccoli will also provide loads of Vitamins K and C, as well as B6 and a fair amount of protein. Tempeh is a great source of magnesium, protein, phosphorus, and calcium.

Finally, there are easy additions to your meal that pack a punch in both flavor and nutrients. Turmeric, ginger, garlic, flax meal and chia seeds all provide a ton of nutritional value in addition to making your healthy meal a bit tastier. Flax meal and chia seeds can be used as a binding element in baking and cooking, or tossed in a smoothie, and provide lots of omega-3s. Turmeric, garlic, and ginger are all anti-inflammatories. The salad pictured above fed 6 Dirt Raggers for about $23 and contains a complete nutritional profile of micros and macros. There’s a ton of stuff in there but drop a line if you’d like to know what we’re eating.

The next time you fracture your collarbone, break a rib or, as I did a few weeks ago, chip off a piece of bone from your wrist, drink lots of water, take plenty of naps, and be sure to keep up with your electrolytes, carbohydrates, and micronutrients and you’ll be back on your bike in no time.

 


New Mexico Orthopaedics is a multi-disciplinary orthopaedic clinic located in Albuquerque New Mexico. We have multiple physical therapy clinics located throughout the Albuquerque metro area.

New Mexico Orthopaedics offers a full spectrum of services related to orthopaedic care and our expertise ranges from acute conditions such as sports injuries and fractures to prolonged, chronic care diagnoses, including total joint replacement and spinal disorders.

Because our team of highly-trained physicians specialize in various aspects of the musculoskeletal system, our practice has the capacity to treat any orthopaedic condition, and offer related support services, such as physical therapy, WorkLink and much more.

If you need orthopedic care in Albuquerque New Mexico contact New Mexico Orthopaedics at 505-724-4300.